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2016 seasons end

Discussion in 'Iowa' started by fun gus, May 16, 2016.

  1. fun gus

    fun gus Morel Enthusiast

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    Strange year. I did the work for 50# but barely got over 10#
    Central Iowa is down 3 inch rain for April/May and temp rain timing wasn't ideal. I lost a strong hitting area to dnr burning out dead cedar. Only one traditional spot hit well about 5# but spread out with one strong early flush and then a couple big yellows every other day for three weeks. Number of mushrooms way down but size amazing
    Pattern of earlier season continues. 20-45 years ago season was about 4/25 to 5/20 This year 4/15-5/11 the new decade average. That doesn't count the March 2012 season. Garlic mustard keeps expanding and screwing things up
    Creek banks and low slopes no more than a random big yellow.
    My and others behavior was not always great. Mushroom mentor passionately wants to help newbies. She had some basics but wasn't refined. Many people- including me- posted unhelpful comments. I apologize. Don't lose the passion! The whole trespassing thing created weirdness. Sg is a good man but pulled a little bit of a "the Donald" with his story. SG keep the passion and stop hiding you have good stories. I forgive you like many forgive Trump
    Pheasant backs and oysters galore.
    Less litter!
    Good news is I still was able to clear the smoke out of my lungs get back into shape and watch spring come again. I have enough frozen shrooms for Christmas and my wife still clears out the family schedule so I can do my thing.
    Here's to another spring in the woods. Respect the earth, respect our brothers (all humans are our brother) and go catch some fish.
    Remember keep it fun Gus!
     
  2. shroom god

    shroom god Morel Connoisseur

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    Well, it's over for me, and it's been quite a season. I've learned much, bonded more closely to the land, tested my limits, reevaluated my boundaries...and am richer for it all. The whole trespassing thing is real and something I struggle with mightily, and obviously a lot of people do so in different ways and for different reasons. I expected that. But Fun Gus, you have it ass-backward, sorta, kinda, but also kinda right. I'm pretty much an extreme "populist" when it comes to philosophical conceptions of private property relative to individual liberty and freedom. Indeed, Trump is considered a "populist candidate. But there the comparison ends. Sanders is also a populist candidate--and I am a Sanders populist. If it were up to me, any singular or private claim to "property" would be subordinate to the public good. I'm a radical libertarian on the matter of private property relative to one's freedom of movement and the legal ramifications thereof. In fact, I'm so radical that my conception of "property" is rooted in The Commons or a Rousseauean "Natural State." I realize I'm a man out of time, but I cannot help that nor do I categorically reject it as flawed. I could elaborate at length about that but the point is I am NOT Trump-esque in my belief; he, after all, believes in using financial and legal clout to deprive less powerful individuals of their right to property. In contrast, I believe the pristine and ideal state of Nature contains no legal conception, claim, or penalties relative to "private" property. American Indians have also struggled mightily with this Eurocentric conception of private property since it was foisted upon them in the late nineteenth century. I feel more in common with them than any so-called "landowner." And, to add more to the mix, the matter of privacy needs to be addressed in another strand, which I will get to in due time. But hey, no harm done and definitely no hard feelings. Every one of us in this community is reading and perceiving things through the lens of their experience and thought, and your point is entirely valid in that regard; of course, I've been accused of being a "relativist." That's okay...to me it's a badge of honor that claims I see and value multiple perspectives on any issue. That, in a nutshell, is the essence of tolerance and empathy.

    The year has been a dichotomy...I took the good with the bad. It was great and it sucked. I started off high and finished low. I've been led to believe I found many but I believe I found few relative to years past. I finished on a high, finding a 8.500-year-old Dalton point on the day I walked 5 miles and found 35 only mushrooms. And I became a grandpa (third time) within 24 hours of that. I'm a bipolar, radical libertarian Naturalist who cries for social, economic, racial, and environmental justice--and peace--and is already thinking about next year.

    Much love to all.
     

  3. fun gus

    fun gus Morel Enthusiast

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    Congrats on grand kids. Short version response. Land rights is not euro centric. Read about the beaver wars. Native American tribes fought over resource: beaver pelts vs morel and territory vs owned land. Many other examples. Alliances were formed through respect and wars through wanton disregard of fundamental respect. (Modern equivellant of asking permission vs overt subterfuge of openly trespassing).
    The Donald I referred to is making polarizing statements that ring true for many and deeply offend others and create feelings of ill will between groups of people, which is what is happening.
    As a libertarian, I believe in our Iowa motto: Our liberties we prize and our rights we will maintain.
    Oddly enough, populism was made popular by farmers who didn't like eminent domain where farmers lost land rights to railroads and industrial tycoons. Populism definitions have evolved to now include political rhetoric.
    I'm saying this because I want to keep the Iowan sensibilities of respecting others property and asking permission, while the farmer grants permission, then the hunter sharing the bounty with the owner.
    Fair and reasonable.
    I love the bounty of Iowa, the wonders of Mother Earth, the tolerance of differing beliefs and the libertarian roots of Robert D Ray.
    Respect one another and love each other as a brother. Enjoy the bounty and preserve the resources while honoring universal truths including mindfulness to self and others.
    Share passions, build alliances and this includes not getting farmers to say no to morel hunters.
    May the spirit of oneness transcend the sence of entitlement felt by our personal misgivings.


     
  4. kb

    kb Morel Connoisseur

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    Dang, this is like a college course. Both of you have a point or two in your favor. Humans have always fought over resources as far back as we can tell. Some are just a little greedier than others. I think that was the basic gripe most natives had with the Euro model of resource use. At least at first. This next election will be interesting. Remember our founding fathers were for the most part businessmen who did not see government as cushy life long employment for them and their family members. How many people running for any federal office can say that anymore?
     
  5. shroomtrooper

    shroomtrooper Morel Connoisseur

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    I can see both point of views, its good we can talk about this, and still be friends.
     
  6. shroom god

    shroom god Morel Connoisseur

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    That's right 'Trooper. It's good to think about and discuss this stuff and remain friends.

    "Beaver wars" is a false equivalency. It is undeniable that indigenous peoples were unfettered by legalistic claims to geographic space and notions of individual property were alien to them. There were no deeds, no "NO TRESSPASSING" or "POSTED" signs, no threats of prosecution. Along vaguely construed "boundary areas," competition between different peoples existed in its purest form, In the absence of private ownership of land, and beaver wars were one of many manifestations of a broader interaction of people within a bounded geographic space, i.e., the competitive pursuits of free peoples in open space.

    Fast forward to today...most space is parceled and privately owned and subject to tax and regulation. The romantic idealist who seeks to roam freely--and seek a genuine but ever-elusive feeling of freedom, unencumbered by signs or fences or threats or prosecution--is a being out of time. And so I am. I would be much more at ease and truer to my very nature were I able to roam freely and compete within boundless space. That is not possible in Iowa!

    Since I can't have it my way, I certainly respect property owners who are gracious and kind and allow me to rove through their timber. I always share with them; that is inherent in the "social contract," and I feel worthy when I have something to share. Their humaneness begets my own. And then there are some who agree, again and again, tentatively, but then nail to trees ominous and threatening signs that send a contrary message. I feel unwelcome in such places. And there are those who employ the fear factor and hide as cowards behind a shield of concern over insurance liability as an excuse to deny access. Such a landowner is devoid of faith or confidence in their fellow human being and is exceedingly insecure, and I want nothing to do with them.

    Times have changed considerably since I was a boy who ranged freely and with impunity like my primordial ancestors. Then, I lived in a veritable state of Nature. But our society has hardened, become less humanistic, less humane, less tolerant, and more confrontational. Private space is increasingly fortified. Gun sales are at an all-time high.

    I resent this and reject this. This is a modern, culturally constructed affront to our innate liberty. As J.J. Rousseau lamented well over two centuries ago, "Man is born free, but everywhere lives in chains." Were only he alive to see what tragedy has befallen freedom in these times.

    Pax.



    Those idealists among us who inexplicably cling to a vestige of our distant but innate humanness fill our minds with images of open and endless space and fresh, clean waters and air and virgin soil, and the chance encounter of another human being.



     
  7. almightymorel

    almightymorel Morel Enthusiast

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    This is awesome I love when other people are not scared to show there knowledge and all get along. I remember when people like to share now everybody's greedy as I get older I see the world fall apart.
     
  8. shroom god

    shroom god Morel Connoisseur

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    You nailed it Almighty One. Greed and possessiveness has crept into our culture and society and the goodwill and trust that formerly existed between people seems to be diminishing. It seems like people are digging in, hunkering down, and "fortifying" within their private spaces and lands.

    It's hard to get permission to hunt mushrooms these days. Used to be you'd knock on the door and people would laugh and say "Sure, go right ahead. Have fun" A person would feel good, head to the woods, and feel good about coming out and sharing. Nowadays, you knock on a door and you're quite liable to be met by an angry-faced, gun-clutching, antisocial type who growls in a menacing tone "I don't allow people on my place."

    What the hell has happened? Greed, possessiveness, anger, and--could it be--insecurity? Is it the latter feeling what is driving the others? I'm trying to be empathetic and understand, but I just don't quite get this attitude.

    Anyway, that's quite a season you had. You must've found a few mother lodes. Hopefully that luck will carry on into next year. Next year is gonna be incredible. All the signs point to that.



     
  9. buckthornman

    buckthornman Morel Connoisseur

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    Encore!!!encore!! Sg thank you for being able to write the way I feel:) meegwich needge! I,m sure I butchered it. But it's ojibwe for hello friend. Once the spiritgod told us go forth tell you find food to sustain a nation. They did it was called manoomin.also known as wild rice. Which is an aquatic grass.FYI. They did fight over rice lakes and sugar forests but I think they wanted the best areas. But there was no signs! Sign,sign everywhere a sign:) do this don't do that can't you read the sign! I quote music and people like Sg a lot, your lerical genius is....stellar. peace and pain buckthornman!
     
  10. shroom god

    shroom god Morel Connoisseur

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    Buckthorn, I am your brother in pain, and share the kinship with all those who endure the feel what we feel, body, mind and soul. There's a special bond among those of us who are so close to and intimate with the land,, those who respect the land so deeply, that it is a very part of the fibre of their being. Naturalists to the core, we meld with nature. Fences and signs and artificial barriers to the pursuit of happiness become invisible. We respect land and nature and the precious moments unfolding and we mean no harm. But some would certainly do us harm...and that, also, is their right. Ultimately it becomes a matter of justice and jurisprudence; unfortunately, natural law has not fared well within the dominant legal construct advantageous to private property.
     
  11. deerhunter93

    deerhunter93 Young Morel

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    SG - "Fences and signs and artificial barriers to the pursuit of happiness become invisible."

    You can't reply to the thread where you get called out for trespassing with people trying to come to your rescue and you keep on doing it. If I ever get to own land one day it will be ONLY for people who I give permission. YOU and people like you are the reason why landowners come to the door angry. I don't understand how people on this site look up to you and praise you.
     
  12. buckthornman

    buckthornman Morel Connoisseur

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    Hey 93 just go kill something! I,m sure you probably are a meat harvesting poaching overkilling type. Just remember 93 keep your treasures up stairs not here on the earth! I'm glad I know how to communicate with property owners. Hey excuse me sir can I look for mushrooms on your land? Sure have at it let me know if you find some! Thanks! Hey Bucky we use to hunt mushrooms. Buttons and morels .... that's what I hear 80% of the time:) and yes there are times I get lost in it! And I don't give flying f%=$ who thinks the possess this planet! Bucky!
     
  13. rfarley

    rfarley Young Morel

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    This weekend is a time to thank veterans for our freedom. I am a vet, so I appreciate all the people who are thankful for us vets. Happy memorial day byes and God bless you all. God bless America, we sure need it in these times.
     
  14. shroomtrooper

    shroomtrooper Morel Connoisseur

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    Thank you veterans for protecting our land of the free.
     
  15. shroomtrooper

    shroomtrooper Morel Connoisseur

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    deerhunter93, we get it, trespassing bad. But cant you see his point at all? Nothing?
     
  16. almightymorel

    almightymorel Morel Enthusiast

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    I feel the same way Sg It's weird how someone so protective of their land guns drawn when all we do is look for mushrooms
     
  17. deerhunter93

    deerhunter93 Young Morel

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    Shroomtrooper - I understand that SG loves nature and doesn't like being kept away from certain areas because a person owns the land. I agree with him and share the same love for the outdoors, however, I am really opposed to trespassing in general. Whether it be hiking, bird watching, deer hunting, mushroom hunting, I was raised that asking for permission is the only way to go if you want to go onto land that is not open to the public.

    Buckthornman - Turkey season is over here in Iowa so I have to wait until October 1st. As far as me being a "meat harvesting poaching overkilling type" I do hunt and provide my wife and I with food for the table (which is honestly the main reason why I mushroom hunt). As far as the "poaching overkilling type" that is quite the opposite but I see no reason in arguing with you because I will likely never meet you in my life and you don't know a thing about me other than my posts about trespassing. And seeing as I graduated from college a year ago and not making much money currently - I sure don't have many earthly "treasures" so yes, my treasures are upstairs.
     
  18. shroomtrooper

    shroomtrooper Morel Connoisseur

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    hey deerhunter don't get me wrong, I agree with you, I guess you would have to hear my voice in the way I said what I said. Congratulations on graduating collage, my son will graduate High school this Wednesday. Ever see the movie Good Will hunting, where Damon plays the genius with the photographic mind, and can recite from memory word for word from a text, kind of flusters Robin Williams. Then Williams comes back saying basically, you can recite words from a book, but you have never been there, never experienced it. Kind of like us old guys, back in the day it was small towns, then farm fields and woods, then farm fields ect, ect. Is this an excuse, hell no. But we did experience it, so its kind of fun sometimes to bond and be rebels cyber wise and get it out of our system. I own a house that has a hill, every year there are kids sliding down my hill, I have seen kids 5 years old who are now in collage. All these years I have not been asked for permission to side down my hill. Its the only hill, I don't care, common sense its the only hill, have at it. Then there is the 50 acres the city owned that they where selling, the same land my friends and I played on when we where kids, nice woods, some lake shore, beautiful. Well a group posing as developers bought the land, turned out it was a some sort of a religious group, the city tried to back out of the deal but legally they could not. They put up a building, want to say church but its not the common denomination like Catholic Christian faith, I never heard of them. They put up no trespassing signs. I sneaked in there to see whats going on( I trespassed) they had a wood chip trail, with sitting benches here and there, a gazebo. I guess in MN if they are classified as a religion they pay no land tax. Why would they need all that land to worship? Why would they post it? Things like these kind of bother me. Places like these are my earthly treasures, I have not much money also. Don't mind Buckthorn, after years of talking to each other we get a little defensive of our shroom mates, you would have to read posts from 3 years ago till now to get my drift. And deerhunter your right bud, and I am impressed you knew what Bucky was talking about keeping it upstairs, kind of lost me on that one. Ha
     
  19. buckthornman

    buckthornman Morel Connoisseur

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    You seemed as though you wanted to argue or debate 93! Glad to hear your a graduate and a steward of the land. And Strooper I've searched church properties and never seen a trespassing sign that's odd. I'd keep an eye on em. Troop did you go up by leech lake or where? You said I'm heading this way buckthornman?
     
  20. kb

    kb Morel Connoisseur

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    Cool move ST. My neighbor put up a fence when the kids used his hill one winter. Had to go back to my dads house, in the old end of town and use my old hill. I also remember when you could roam where you wanted pretty much, all those spots are posted now. I saw this coming long ago due to a confluence of factors: Big time hunt clubs that post and prosecute like crazy. the internet spreading the gospel of the morel equals so many more people hunting now. Demand drives the price ever upward which equals more looking for no reason other than a buck. I can see many states soon requiring a licence and limiting what you can harvest. Many would rather see them rot then let someone like me pick #20 on good days. I can see them trying to treat morels like deer even though the morel will rot in a few days and be gone forever.