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It's all about learning trees. My best luck has been north/south/east facing hills, preferably along the bottoms next to rivers and creeks in mostly pure poplar stands. The poplars I'm talking about are Tulip Poplars (or Tulip Trees, etc.) and are very common and easily identified.

Other trees to look for are Ash, which look very much like Poplars except for the leaves, and dead/dying Elms. Elms work wonders for morel hunters in the midwest, with some having pounds and pounds growing under and around a single tree. While not as common (at least in my experience) in Virginia, there are still Elms here and there, and I was lucky enough to come across 2 standing dead ones a few years ago that had lots of big beautiful blonde morels under them. Unfortunately I only got to pick there once as the property was sold later that year.

Anyway, another tree to look out for is the Redbud tree. They're common in suburban yards as ornamentals, but also grow wild (at least further west). They're easily identified in spring by the bright purplish/pinkish color of their buds, and when you see this it's a good indicator that morels in that area are up or on their way up. I haven't seen morels growing specifically around Redbuds, they're only used as an indicator for the season. Another indicator is the Tulip Poplar I mentioned. When their leaves are about the size of a quarter it's typically prime morel season. Living in the foothills of the Blue Ridge, I can look at a mountainside and when I see that bright yellow/green of young poplar leaves streaking across it, I know it's time.

Feel free to ask if you have any questions, and Happy Hunting!
I live in Ararat, VA. Grew up in Wyoming county, WV. Hunted mollymoochers for 16 years in WV and Roanoke, VA before moving to Patrick county, VA. I can't seem to find any here. Alot if old farmers tell me the soil here is nit right for them to grow here. Any suggestions?? Morel lover forever
 

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Howdy Patricia...
Wade here... So very Happy to have you Joining us!!
My home area is Monroe County Indiana
where I've Morel Hunted for 54 years now
i can not advise you about your local soils.. Other than to say; i doubt that all of your areas soils are unable to sustain Morels..
i have learned Morels will grow Wherever they want to..and i still find Myself surprised when i find them some where i never thought i would.. and likewise find Zero..where it seemed they should surely be plentiful..
Here is a picture near Bristle Tennessee
Screenshot_20200130-195824_Gallery.jpg
when you see Red buds this Brilliant, its Time to pull over and start looking.. Everywhere..and around Sycamore and Elm trees..
i Think you will find yourself Happily surprised with what folks just driving by have No idea of...
One thing is sure..
The Mystery will always be..
You won't know if You don't Go!
Enjoy the Hunt
from Wade
 

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I live in Ararat, VA. Grew up in Wyoming county, WV. Hunted mollymoochers for 16 years in WV and Roanoke, VA before moving to Patrick county, VA. I can't seem to find any here. Alot if old farmers tell me the soil here is nit right for them to grow here. Any suggestions?? Morel lover forever
Hi Patricia, I took a quick look at Patrick co.and you seem to have the same problem I have acidic soils. I’m in Maryland but share the same problem. We need to find more alkaline soils that the morels prefer. I use the USDA soil survey maps to help with this. You can get some pH test results there. If you don’t want to do that,as a general rule you will find a higher pH along creeks and rivers. Since you have hunted morels before I’m sure you know trees matter too... I hope this helps and best of luck..
 
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