2020 Morel Season

Discussion in 'Texas' started by Mushroom Geologist, Jan 21, 2020.

  1. Mushroom Geologist

    Mushroom Geologist Morel Connoisseur

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    They are all beyond gone here. Found a lot of soggy ones the other day. Tyler Texas area
     
  2. LindaleTexas

    LindaleTexas Morel Enthusiast

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    Hunted 7 hours yesterday without a single find. The area looked great but no morels that I could see. I still have the small group that was left to grow and will check on them later this week.
     

  3. LindaleTexas

    LindaleTexas Morel Enthusiast

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    I’m by far no expert but I agree that it is ending here. Geologist I look forward to picking your brain about chanterelles. I have never found any but have seen post from you related to them. Do you hunt the same woods and target different trees for them?
     
    Jackmo11 likes this.
  4. HoosierInTexas

    HoosierInTexas Morel Enthusiast

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    Morel (1)_kindlephoto-12202099.jpg Could someone please verify before I get too excited -- I think this is a half-free?
     
  5. Tool fan

    Tool fan Morel Connoisseur

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    I can’t tell picture to me is a lil fuzzy thinking stink horn maybe idk
    Just a guess
     
  6. Zabz

    Zabz Morel Enthusiast

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    Cut it in half
     
  7. Inthewild

    Inthewild Morel Connoisseur

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    If you cut in half and it has no cottonious fibers AND it didn't come from a ball at the root, it is most likely a half free. If it gets lifted from a root ball, It's a stink horn. If you really want another test, smell it. If it smells like S**t, simply don't eat.
     
    Tool fan likes this.
  8. benthegrate

    benthegrate Morel Connoisseur

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    That is definitely a stinkhorn. Edible, believe it or not. Stinkhorn eggs are prized in Asia. That's the stage before the mushroom pierces the volva and grows into stinky maturity. This one has had all the gleba (stinky spore-bearing goo) picked away by flies.

    Chanterelles are prolific during wet summers here. They are easily found in mixed oak forests here in Texas, and in some years I've picked 20 pounds in an hour. There are only 2 common look-alikes, neither are deadly. The jack-o'-lantern mushroom has true paper-thin gills and causes severe gastric upset if eaten, but easy to distinguish from chanterelles because they have gills, and chanterelles do not. The other common look-alike, the False Chanterelle, is eaten by many, but does not grow commonly in Texas. (I've never found one here.)

    I've found them as early as May, and as late as November. But we need a good 3 soaking rains in a week to trigger a BIG fruiting.

    Google "Ben Starr chanterelles" for my article on them! MushroomGeologist can give more accurate info on their East Texas growth patterns. In Texas, I've foraged them mostly in DFW suburban parks, and the national forests in Southeast Texas, but they are found everywhere in Texas where non-evergreen oak trees grow.
     
    Jackmo11 likes this.
  9. Mushroom Geologist

    Mushroom Geologist Morel Connoisseur

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    Smell it and if you wont eat it then its a stinkhorn, Looks kike one to me.
     
  10. Mushroom Geologist

    Mushroom Geologist Morel Connoisseur

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    I go for oaks in bottoms. They are the other only mushroom I pick and eat. They grow like crazy in East Texas and they get really big. I have the smaller version of chanterelles on my place but they taste just as good. They really like sandy loam oak bottoms. Look for flooding areas as well. Probably around the river bottom between Lindale and Mineola would be where i would look. I'm already looking for them as we are seeing 80's. Needs to stay in the 80's and upper 60's at night to get them going. Nothing yet but Mid to Late April is usually when I see them. Good easy rule of thumb is when the blackberries/dueberries are near ripe. Chanterelles are out. Also, if you dont have any on your place, find some on someone else's place and take a few and soak them in a 5gallon bucket of water. Make a spore soup and put the soup around well shaded oaks and you will have chanterelles in no time. Chanterelles hate sunlight.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2020 at 9:32 PM
  11. HoosierInTexas

    HoosierInTexas Morel Enthusiast

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    Screenshot_20200327-014910_kindlephoto-44799423.png
    It's a stinkhorn, dang it. I was hoping to notch up my first morel find in TX, after starting to look 3 years ago.
     

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  12. LindaleTexas

    LindaleTexas Morel Enthusiast

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    Thanks guys for your detailed responses. I look forward to finding some in east Texas as there are lots of oaks to search through.
     
  13. LindaleTexas

    LindaleTexas Morel Enthusiast

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    Went and picked the small cluster that was left Sunday, as Smith county is getting more strict at midnight. They did grow but are becoming brittle. The two pics with the grizzly can are the same mushroom five days apart.
     

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