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I am a new addition to this forum. I want to thank everyone who posted during the morel season as I was able to start hunting early and found a few new small patches in the inner city area this mid-April. This summer was my first summer to forage for chanterelles and I've found approximately 20 oz. in the past three days on my parents property in Acton, IN. What a treat, seriously such an immense pleasure to find. I harvest about eight ounces under a massive ivy ground cover just this morning. Used the first eleven ounces to make a chanterelle apple pie recipe taken from the book Radical Mycology by Peter McCoy which I'd highly recommend the book to anyone interest in growing their own mushrooms. These are some initial photos these are not as pretty as the ones I found under the cover because they were more exposed to the elements and I found them just a day or two after the last big rain. Thought I'd share. I don't use any social media but y'all sucked me in!!!
 

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View attachment 40074 View attachment 40075 View attachment 40076

I am a new addition to this forum. I want to thank everyone who posted during the morel season as I was able to start hunting early and found a few new small patches in the inner city area this mid-April. This summer was my first summer to forage for chanterelles and I've found approximately 20 oz. in the past three days on my parents property in Acton, IN. What a treat, seriously such an immense pleasure to find. I harvest about eight ounces under a massive ivy ground cover just this morning. Used the first eleven ounces to make a chanterelle apple pie recipe taken from the book Radical Mycology by Peter McCoy which I'd highly recommend the book to anyone interest in growing their own mushrooms. These are some initial photos these are not as pretty as the ones I found under the cover because they were more exposed to the elements and I found them just a day or two after the last big rain. Thought I'd share. I don't use any social media but y'all sucked me in!!!
Nice to have you here. Keep in touch with the tread and learn a lot from the members nice find
 

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View attachment 40074 View attachment 40075 View attachment 40076

I am a new addition to this forum. I want to thank everyone who posted during the morel season as I was able to start hunting early and found a few new small patches in the inner city area this mid-April. This summer was my first summer to forage for chanterelles and I've found approximately 20 oz. in the past three days on my parents property in Acton, IN. What a treat, seriously such an immense pleasure to find. I harvest about eight ounces under a massive ivy ground cover just this morning. Used the first eleven ounces to make a chanterelle apple pie recipe taken from the book Radical Mycology by Peter McCoy which I'd highly recommend the book to anyone interest in growing their own mushrooms. These are some initial photos these are not as pretty as the ones I found under the cover because they were more exposed to the elements and I found them just a day or two after the last big rain. Thought I'd share. I don't use any social media but y'all sucked me in!!!
@HeartlandFungivore . You have Landed in the Right Spot ...
Howdy Wade here🤠
You Make us So Proud that we Suck..
Chantrells apple pie.. my my my, that sounds Good
 

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@HeartlandFungivore -- Please post your Chanterelle Apple Pie pics & recipe. That's a new one for me and it sounds great!

I might even trade a piece of Jack's (Michigan) Chanterelle Crawdad Pie for your Chanterelle Apple pie.
I didn't take photos of the pie but I will if I make another one! Here is the pie recipe verbatim from Radical Mycology:

Crust:
2 cups (500 mL) unbleached white wheat pastry flour, alternately mix 50:50 with rye flour to make it a heartier, more savory pie
0.5 teaspoons salt
11 tablespoons cold butter, lard, or vegetable shortening
Up to 6.5 cups (240 mL) ice water, optionally combined with a dash of Candy Cap mushroom extract

Filling:
1-2 lbs. (0.5- 1 kg) fresh Chanterelles, wiped clean and broken into chunks [*I only had 11 oz. but worked just fine*]
1 medium yellow onion, sliced lengthwise
Salt
1-2 pounds tart, crisp apples and/or crabapples, washed, cored, and sliced
1-inch (2 cm) fresh ginger rhizome, peeled and finely grated
2-4 tablespoons butter, lard (preferred), or coconut oil
Sweet or hard cider
1 heaping tablespoon of honey

Process:
1. Working quickly, grate the butter into the flour and salt.
2. Combine the ingredients with a fork.
3. Add the water little by little until the mix starts to clump together. Put down the fork and form a ball of dough with our hands. Do not overwork the dough or let it warm up: if you do, the pastry will not be flaky. Cut the ball in half and put it in the fridge while you make the filling.
4. Preheat the oven to 420 degrees Fahrenheit (215 degrees Celsius)
5. If the Chanterelles are fresh, heat a large skillet over medium high heat and dry saute them until the moisture has evaporated. If they are relatively dry, skip this step.
6. Melt the fat in the skillet and saute the Chanterelles and the onion with a sprinkle of salt. If the mix is browning too fast, turn down the heat.
7. Continue until the onions are caramelized, deglazing the pans periodically with cider. [*I did not have cider so I used extra lard to deglaze and it worked just fine*].
8. Add the ginger and apples and reduce the heat. Combine.
9. When the apples have just begun to soften (1-2 min), turn off the heat and add the honey. Mix in the honey well so it coats everything. [*I added a little extra honey ^_^ *]
10. Adjust seasoning to taste.
11. Roll out half the dough on a floured surface, spreading from the center outward (like mycelium).
12. When it has slightly overgrown your "pietri" dish, transfer it into the dish.
13. Roll out the other half of the dough, then fill the pie.
14. Cover with the second dough. Pinch around the edges to seal and cut some little vent holes in the top crust.
15. Pop it in the oven. After 10 minutes, reduce the heat to 360 degrees Fahrenheit (180 degrees Celsius).
16. Bake for another 35-45 minutes, or until the crust is golden-brown and juice is bubbling up from the holes.
17. Cool at least 10 minutes before serving. Serve hot or cold.

He has a few other recipes in here include Mushroom Katsup, Bolete Bacon, Black Trumpet and Nettle Quiche, and Fried Chicken of the Woods Sandwich. My family ate the pie in less than 24 hrs. my dad and brother both having 3 pieces each and claiming it's the best pie they've ever had. Interestingly, my dad had dreams he described as being real life. The book says Chanterelles are radical scavengers so maybe they restore the pituitary?
 

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Even though I used a flip phone to take these photos I think the top one is especially gorgeous. Found these in Bowling Green, IN. Barely covered the property in three hours so I can't imagine what else there was to find. Found a wide variety of boletes some of which I believe are edible but I'm having a hard time identifying to be honest. Taking a spore print now but the varieties of boletes seem so extensive. Does anyone have confidence with Boletes? There was crazy fungus in this woods everywhere I turned! Two looks a likes growing everywhere with the chanterelles I believe just the false chanterelles and jack-o-lanterns. I'll try to upload a video of a very tricky one later today.

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Even though I used a flip phone to take these photos I think the top one is especially gorgeous. Found these in Bowling Green, IN. Barely covered the property in three hours so I can't imagine what else there was to find. Found a wide variety of boletes some of which I believe are edible but I'm having a hard time identifying to be honest. Taking a spore print now but the varieties of boletes seem so extensive. Does anyone have confidence with Boletes? There was crazy fungus in this woods everywhere I turned! Two looks a likes growing everywhere with the chanterelles I believe just the false chanterelles and jack-o-lanterns. I'll try to upload a photo of a very tricky one later today. Approximately 30 oz. harvested here.

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Even though I used a flip phone to take these photos I think the top one is especially gorgeous. Found these in Bowling Green, IN. Barely covered the property in three hours so I can't imagine what else there was to find. Found a wide variety of boletes some of which I believe are edible but I'm having a hard time identifying to be honest. Taking a spore print now but the varieties of boletes seem so extensive. Does anyone have confidence with Boletes? There was crazy fungus in this woods everywhere I turned! Two looks a likes growing everywhere with the chanterelles I believe just the false chanterelles and jack-o-lanterns. I'll try to upload a video of a very tricky one later today.

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Very nice chants. Guess I better get out there.Bowling Green is close to my stomping grounds.
 

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Howdy y,all. Wade here...

While at the Flea market on June 27th...
I look down and there it is..the same exact model of ice cream maker Papaw & Gramaw
Used for us back in the mid 1960's and it already had some years on it then.. I'm born April 1963
So maybe a 1950's model 💪🏻
With a price tag of only $10.. Ten dollars!!!😳
You already know,, I didn't have to think on that price .
Now all I need is an Authentic old Recipe 🇺🇸
40113

No one in my family has been able to find Our old Recipe ..
  • I know we had our own milk cow
  • I do Remember an old can of Hershey Coco
  • and an old bottle of Vanilla extract
PLEASE if anyone has an Authentic old Family Recipe from Your own childhood..
Help Me Out Here..
 

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Howdy y,all. Wade here...

While at the Flea market on June 27th...
I look down and there it is..the same exact model of ice cream maker Papaw & Gramaw
Used for us back in the mid 1960's and it already had some years on it then.. I'm born April 1963
So maybe a 1950's model 💪🏻
With a price tag of only $10.. Ten dollars!!!😳
You already know,, I didn't have to think on that price .
Now all I need is an Authentic old Recipe 🇺🇸 View attachment 40113
No one in my family has been able to find Our old Recipe ..
  • I know we had our own milk cow
  • I do Remember an old can of Hershey Coco
  • and an old bottle of Vanilla extract
PLEASE if anyone has an Authentic old Family Recipe from Your own childhood..
Help Me Out Here..
[/QUOTE
Hi Wade nice find. Looks like a 50' s model. There are old fashioned ice cream recipes on you tube. Hope this helps.
 

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What kind of trees where you finding these gorgeous chants in?
Thanks in advance.
Hey, I am not a pro with tree identification yet. But the woods out there in Bowling Green is a majority of maples and poplar. There was one massive oak on the side of the general hill where I found quite a load and lots of good little bunches of chanterelles were found around that oak. I am going to go back out though so I will try harder to take note of any different trees. The chanterelles I found in Bowling Green were pretty deep in the woods but on the top and sides of hills that were surrounded by creeks. The chanterelles I found in Acton were all bordering the woods and under large ground ivy coverage. They were not near any creek but near a flatland where water will collect and stand for long periods of time after a rain. It was so dark in the woods in Bowling Green that the majority of the chanterelles I found seemed to be growing out of or near a moss. I wonder if the moss was photosynthesizing for the fungus...
 

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What kind of trees where you finding these gorgeous chants in?
Thanks in advance.
I find mine on a mixed oak, beech and maple hardwood ridge. And that's the advice that I have received in general as far a where to look. and it's near the top of the ridge, so it's not super wet. And they are all over!

And Heartland, fungi, mushrooms do NOT photosynthesize! Think about it. They have no cholorophyll, what need have they of photosynthesis? Mushrooms are simply the fruiting bodies of their mycelium, which grows entirely underground. Hidden from sunlight, again, what does it need with photosynthesis?

I find my Chants nowhere near any moss. Yet, you will rarely see a pic of a black trumpet without moss. I think this simply indicates that the mushroom likes that environment to grow in. Even within the same species there is a lot of latitude for individual variability.
 

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I find mine on a mixed oak, beech and maple hardwood ridge. And that's the advice that I have received in general as far a where to look. and it's near the top of the ridge, so it's not super wet. And they are all over!

And Heartland, fungi, mushrooms do NOT photosynthesize! Think about it. They have no cholorophyll, what need have they of photosynthesis? Mushrooms are simply the fruiting bodies of their mycelium, which grows entirely underground. Hidden from sunlight, again, what does it need with photosynthesis?

I find my Chants nowhere near any moss. Yet, you will rarely see a pic of a black trumpet without moss. I think this simply indicates that the mushroom likes that environment to grow in. Even within the same species there is a lot of latitude for individual variability.
I find mine on a mixed oak, beech and maple hardwood ridge. And that's the advice that I have received in general as far a where to look. and it's near the top of the ridge, so it's not super wet. And they are all over!

And Heartland, fungi, mushrooms do NOT photosynthesize! Think about it. They have no cholorophyll, what need have they of photosynthesis? Mushrooms are simply the fruiting bodies of their mycelium, which grows entirely underground. Hidden from sunlight, again, what does it need with photosynthesis?

I find my Chants nowhere near any moss. Yet, you will rarely see a pic of a black trumpet without moss. I think this simply indicates that the mushroom likes that environment to grow in. Even within the same species there is a lot of latitude for individual variability.
Hi yes, I am aware that fungi are animals not plants however fungi like all animals benefit from consuming plants as the plants produce carbohydrates in photosynthesis which support the life of the animal i.e. the host tree or moss. From my understanding this is the whole purpose of the symbiotic relationship between the fungus and the tree usually I was just curious if the moss could add an extra plus.
 

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Spore slurries from rotting parts of chanterelles I picked off while making the pies. Will use them to slurry bomb areas in Bowling Green and Acton to further encourage return growth in the coming years. Made sure to leave plenty behind. Pictures of two chanterelle apple pies made yesterday.
 

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