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This is my first year hunting wood lovers. I have only grown up hunting morels.. which i just got ahold of some syringes of black Morchella liquid culture and am going to start trying to cultivate those indoors. But they deforested my woods about 2 years ago. So I am hoping it is loaded with chickens and im really hoping to find some lions main this year. I have alot of turkey tail that I am going to harvest this year too.
Nice, well your off to a good start of the first year! You know your wood eating species and have your sights set! Yes those were Oyster, & them bugs love em too lol! GoodLuck with the science experiment(morchella) & further species Trophies foraged! Look forward to hearing more of your hunts!
 

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I found a mess of Pleurotus ostreatus(Pearl Oyster), week or two back. I like to harvest them bout handsize spread & smaller. I will take what I get though(drying larger for mush powder seasoning). If larger, I'll leave outside abit for creepy crawlers to find their way out. Then lightly brush off any dirt wood/grass debris. Personal choice I "Do Not" soak or even rinse. Damp Napkin/ Paper Towel helps remove stubborn particles. I should say, I do these things to all variety of mush, no matter size or shape. For Chicken, just look for bright colored not faded or buggy. Some sites may say smaller are better, but I like them to Fan out & Pile for a decent harvest. Dependent upon when I can get backout, weather, bugs, visibility, location, other hunters, I may harvest then & there.
Ahh ok, lol too late for the no soak here. I already tossed them into a bowl of brine. Sounds good, seems like my chickens are still pretty young.
Quick question. The dead tree they are on seems to be drying up pretty quick with this heat and wind today.
do You think it may be a good idea to take a couple gallons of distilled water out and resoak the log?
 

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Cool. Check to see if the gills run down the stem(decurrent). Will also have a distinct earthy anise or even a fishy smell. These ones most likely be to far gone next wknd & be insect supper for the week. But hey still check it out while out anyways..GoodLuck & Hope Ya Catch that durn' Chicken ripe next week!! Happy 🍄 Hunts!
I know that pheonix oysters have a mild aroma and flavor of anise but I had never heard this for any other oyster and those are for sure not pheonix oysters but I do get the fishy smell for sure
I found a mess of Pleurotus ostreatus(Pearl Oyster), week or two back. I like to harvest them bout handsize spread & smaller. I will take what I get though(drying larger for mush powder seasoning). If larger, I'll leave outside abit for creepy crawlers to find their way out. Then lightly brush off any dirt wood/grass debris. Personal choice I "Do Not" soak or even rinse. Damp Napkin/ Paper Towel helps remove stubborn particles. I should say, I do these things to all variety of mush, no matter size or shape. For Chicken, just look for bright colored not faded or buggy. Some sites may say smaller are better, but I like them to Fan out & Pile for a decent harvest. Dependent upon when I can get backout, weather, bugs, visibility, location, other hunters, I may harvest then & there.
Hey is there a particular visual attribute to look for when chickens are ripened? Im guessing that those oyster are better what caught young and small?
I agree with all the above. I wanted to add that for flavor oysters are best picked before the caps start to fan up so as long as the caps are still downturned the taste should be good. I also go by how much bug damage and water damage. I don't like oysters if they've been washed in water. If they are sturdy enough I've found just shaking them or even lightly going through the gills with a toothpick will get out any competitor bugs. last year on thanksgiving day i found a massive haul of pleaurotus ostreatus and earlier this year i found some oysters in bowling green, the bugs come fast even on the small ones. Also last year I found a lion's mane downtown about twenty feet up in a maple but it had yellowed/turned pretty significantly. the one i found here did not have long hairs but was extremely cylindrical and the hairs were short like spikes
!
 

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Ahh ok, lol too late for the no soak here. I already tossed them into a bowl of brine. Sounds good, seems like my chickens are still pretty young.
Quick question. The dead tree they are on seems to be drying up pretty quick with this heat and wind today.
do You think it may be a good idea to take a couple gallons of distilled water out and resoak the log?
I wouldn't directly soak the log with the mushrooms growing on them. Instead I'd dig a hole and soak the area with water and bury the log inside the hole (this is if the log is vertical). if the log is laying horizontal you can try soaking areas where the mushrooms are not already growing but i wouldn't directly apply large amounts of water to the growing mushrooms
 

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I wouldn't directly soak the log with the mushrooms growing on them. Instead I'd dig a hole and soak the area with water and bury the log inside the hole (this is if the log is vertical). if the log is laying horizontal you can try soaking areas where the mushrooms are not already growing but i wouldn't directly apply large amounts of water to the growing mushrooms
buy bury the log in the hole i mean only a foot or so deep leave the rest with the mushrooms exposed outside to the air and environment
 

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Ahh ok, lol too late for the no soak here. I already tossed them into a bowl of brine. Sounds good, seems like my chickens are still pretty young.
Quick question. The dead tree they are on seems to be drying up pretty quick with this heat and wind today.
do You think it may be a good idea to take a couple gallons of distilled water out and resoak the log?
Personally wouldnt.. Don't think it matter much. I tend to let Mother Nature run her course. If You'd like to get a little more hands' on "Go with your Gut" instinct &/or try @HeartlandFungivore Tips, if Ya want to experiment..You wont do harm either way!
 

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Hey is there a particular visual attribute to look for when chickens are ripened? Im guessing that those oyster are better what caught young and small?
Like Hawkeye said, look for really bright colors that don't seem the least bit faded. And use your sense of touch. Feel them. There should be some "give" to them. Especially the outer 2". Same with the oysters.
 

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I wouldn't directly soak the log with the mushrooms growing on them. Instead I'd dig a hole and soak the area with water and bury the log inside the hole (this is if the log is vertical). if the log is laying horizontal you can try soaking areas where the mushrooms are not already growing but i wouldn't directly apply large amounts of water to the growing mushrooms
this is a standing tree though about 10 or 15 ft tall. Still has some branches on it i think.
I wonder if it would help it along and if I were to drill a hole about a foot above it and then stick a glass watering vase into the tree? The kind people use to water their house plants with. Allowing the log to slowing soak the water and let gravity draw the water down to the mycelium?
 

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Personally wouldnt.. Don't think it matter much. I tend to let Mother Nature run her course. If You'd like to get a little more hands' on "Go with your Gut" instinct &/or try @HeartlandFungivore Tips, if Ya want to experiment..You wont do harm either way!
Ha I don't mean to keep bugging you. But I wanted to bounce a cultivation idea off you.
I have a small creek or you might call it a ditch, that is between 3ft up to 6ft wide and we own about a mile or maybe a mile and a half of it.
I had an idea the other night. Do you think it would work.
if I were to take a post hole auger and punch a few hundred or even maybe a thousand holes 1ft by 1ft sq from each other from one end to the other and then drop hard wood logs into them.
drill holes all over each log and inject liquid cultures and use wood quirks or I think there's a few places that even sell something like mushroom plugs?
 

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Im also looking for input on growing morel mushrooms in a controlled environment.
I have a couple syringes of black morchella liquid culture. I am going use a couple of them to start playing around with a chest freezer and my stand up deep freezer.
But I have 4 big hog pits that used to have hog building over them "they don't get used for anything anymore".
Does anyone think it could be possible to cultivate morels on a large scale with something like that? I was thinking that I could pickup some reefer units off of some freezer trailers and mount 4 or 6 per pit and put them on thermostats to simulate a false winter several times a year, also Setup a bar controller with dehumidifiers and a misting system to control the humidity level and if actually required to fruit then also to simulate a heavy flood rain.

Has anyone on here successfully fruited morels in a controlled environment?
 

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Ha I don't mean to keep bugging you. But I wanted to bounce a cultivation idea off you.
I have a small creek or you might call it a ditch, that is between 3ft up to 6ft wide and we own about a mile or maybe a mile and a half of it.
I had an idea the other night. Do you think it would work.
if I were to take a post hole auger and punch a few hundred or even maybe a thousand holes 1ft by 1ft sq from each other from one end to the other and then drop hard wood logs into them.
drill holes all over each log and inject liquid cultures and use wood quirks or I think there's a few places that even sell something like mushroom plugs?
You are not going to get far injecting liquid culture into a log. You need to convert your liquid culture into grain or especially sawdust or plug spawns and then inoculate your logs.
 

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this is a standing tree though about 10 or 15 ft tall. Still has some branches on it i think.
I wonder if it would help it along and if I were to drill a hole about a foot above it and then stick a glass watering vase into the tree? The kind people use to water their house plants with. Allowing the log to slowing soak the water and let gravity draw the water down to the mycelium?
I would not mess with the tree. Instead dig a trench around your tree and consistently flood the trench to raise general humidity in the area. this is how japanese have successfully cultivated morels in a repeatable fashion. they first make their spawn blocks usually out of soil or compost and oak but not entirely hardwood. they let the bags incubate and grow out. they bury the bags in soil with a vey specific pH and then build trenches alongside the buried bags. come spring they flood those trenches around the bags. once the bags are visibily inoculating the soil they add something called a nutritional bag that has gone through full sterilization and mostly consists of grain and a nitrogen supplier. they set these bags all on top of the myceliated soil open face down. then they get morels. this whole process requires a flow hood and a sterilizer but it's provided successful cultivation for repeatable years. I can send you the actual resesarch paper if you are interested.
 

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I would not mess with the tree. Instead dig a trench around your tree and consistently flood the trench to raise general humidity in the area. this is how japanese have successfully cultivated morels in a repeatable fashion. they first make their spawn blocks usually out of soil or compost and oak but not entirely hardwood. they let the bags incubate and grow out. they bury the bags in soil with a vey specific pH and then build trenches alongside the buried bags. come spring they flood those trenches around the bags. once the bags are visibily inoculating the soil they add something called a nutritional bag that has gone through full sterilization and mostly consists of grain and a nitrogen supplier. they set these bags all on top of the myceliated soil open face down. then they get morels. this whole process requires a flow hood and a sterilizer but it's provided successful cultivation for repeatable years. I can send you the actual resesarch paper if you are interested.
sometimes they even build artificial canopies. also, many people have just randomly gotten morels to grow by through liquid culture in soil that has high levels of ash. this could be a method you attempt but it's generally not been repeatable and very luck/circumstance has it. if you filled your buckets with oak, compost, and maybe large amounts of ash then inoculated early spring who knows you may get lucky.
 

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sometimes they even build artificial canopies. also, many people have just randomly gotten morels to grow by through liquid culture in soil that has high levels of ash. this could be a method you attempt but it's generally not been repeatable and very luck/circumstance has it. if you filled your buckets with oak, compost, and maybe large amounts of ash then inoculated early spring who knows you may get lucky.
i personally prefer to make my grain spawn before inoculating anything. I've tried even inoculating my bags directly with liquid spawn for shaggy mane and some other strains and the growth falters. there's a reason top mycologists never do this in practice. it's lengthy and rarely a successful compared to inoculating with grain spawn
 

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Im also looking for input on growing morel mushrooms in a controlled environment.
I have a couple syringes of black morchella liquid culture. I am going use a couple of them to start playing around with a chest freezer and my stand up deep freezer.
But I have 4 big hog pits that used to have hog building over them "they don't get used for anything anymore".
Does anyone think it could be possible to cultivate morels on a large scale with something like that? I was thinking that I could pickup some reefer units off of some freezer trailers and mount 4 or 6 per pit and put them on thermostats to simulate a false winter several times a year, also Setup a bar controller with dehumidifiers and a misting system to control the humidity level and if actually required to fruit then also to simulate a heavy flood rain.

Has anyone on here successfully fruited morels in a controlled environment?
If you are willing to do all this then you should definitely invest in a lab and make your spawn blocks. Ditch the liquid culture
 

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Ha I don't mean to keep bugging you. But I wanted to bounce a cultivation idea off you.
I have a small creek or you might call it a ditch, that is between 3ft up to 6ft wide and we own about a mile or maybe a mile and a half of it.
I had an idea the other night. Do you think it would work.
if I were to take a post hole auger and punch a few hundred or even maybe a thousand holes 1ft by 1ft sq from each other from one end to the other and then drop hard wood logs into them.
drill holes all over each log and inject liquid cultures and use wood quirks or I think there's a few places that even sell something like mushroom plugs?
If you want to move forward on liquid culture alone this just came back to me on my way home from the grocery store (I was talking chanterelle cultivation with the produce manager at the store). I've heard that a way to get successful morel symbiosis with an oak tree is to drill into exposed roots of the oak and then inoculate with sawdust spawn. I think this could be a better approach for the liquid culture route. My avoidance of liquid culture being used as a final inoculation has a few reasons. 1) you can make tons and tons and tons of inoculated substrate with a couple hundred mL's of liquid culture you will barely be able to inoculate much of anything with just liquid culture alone 2) once the liquid culture is gone it's gone but if you use it to inoculate into grain you can do way more experimentation and keep dividing your spawn out for tops three generations that way you don't just waste all your liquid culture 3) based on my own experiences with inoculating liquid cultures directly into final substrate there's higher chance of senescing and the inoculation period will be much longer.
 

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I would not mess with the tree. Instead dig a trench around your tree and consistently flood the trench to raise general humidity in the area. this is how japanese have successfully cultivated morels in a repeatable fashion. they first make their spawn blocks usually out of soil or compost and oak but not entirely hardwood. they let the bags incubate and grow out. they bury the bags in soil with a vey specific pH and then build trenches alongside the buried bags. come spring they flood those trenches around the bags. once the bags are visibily inoculating the soil they add something called a nutritional bag that has gone through full sterilization and mostly consists of grain and a nitrogen supplier. they set these bags all on top of the myceliated soil open face down. then they get morels. this whole process requires a flow hood and a sterilizer but it's provided successful cultivation for repeatable years. I can send you the actual resesarch paper if you are interested.
That would be awesome, I would love to read the write up on their tek.
 

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You are not going to get far injecting liquid culture into a log. You need to convert your liquid culture into grain or especially sawdust or plug spawns and then inoculate your logs.
I was actually thinking of using the plugs in my creek.
I figure if I drill holes into the bed of the creek and drop logs into them vertically like telephone poles. Then drill them and put plugs for chicken, hens, lions main, and a few other wood lovers. The creek would keep the logs moist enough to keep them going without having to maintain them with all of the extras like humidity control ect. The creek would be seasonal harvesting though.
The morels I want to harvest year round and is why I am trying to figure them out. So I can start farming them in my pits.
 

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That would be awesome, I would love to read the write up on their tek.
Here is a link to the abstract: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07388551.2017.1333082?journalCode=ibty20

turns out I can't send you my copy because I accessed it through my academic institution but it's worthwhile to purchase and/or fine through your own resources at least this will give you access to the title and general information inside so you can decide for yourself how far you want to dig. this is all outdoor cultivation.

as far as indoor cultivation check out Ron Ower's work. Essentially he applied a casing method (to me this is very similar to the Japanese method of throwing on a second nutritional bag) and he was able to get indoor growth. If you are going to try growing indoors you are going to need a flow hood and a sterilizer that ideally forms a vacuum. At the end of the day, if you did successfully cultivate morels indoors and you didn't have a flow hood or a sterilizer of some sort then you're going to be ill-prepared to generate more unless you had just planned to buy more liquid culture. it's much more profitable to be able to clone your own specimen and then plate it yourself after a successful growth because the fruitbody coming out of your experimentation will be adapted to grow in the environmental conditions you placed it under making any inoculations coming from a clone of that mushroom much more likely to succeed. You could always create spore slurry's and try inoculating them indoors but without a flow hood you're at big risk of contamination tons of money and time wasted and the other route, buying liquid culture over and over again, is going to get old.

As to the log inoculation method with the plug spawns you'll want a flow hood in order to make your liquid culture inoculations onto the plug spawns or else once again contamination is likely to lead to a waste of money and time but the creek idea is excellent. If you are going with shiitake the shiitake will need a cold shock regardless so I don't think it's worth it to bury them from the beginning but instead just to stack them so they are ready to toss in the water and then bury in the sand along the creek post 24-hr soak in the creek
 
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