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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
I'm east of Springfield, MO in Douglas Co. I still have some elms scattered around. Some older ones around old homesteads on my place. Never find any Morels with them. I can find them in rocky/cherty hillsides under almost every variety of tree so long as there is some reasonable amount of good soil with it--not real sandy. Generally have Oak forests w/ Hickory. Never find Morels or anything under Black Walnut for obvious reasons. Move from S-facing slopes early onto N-facing slopes late season. Particulary interesting is that cedar woods give up very nice tall/large morels in the late season if the ground can stay some moist. Never found a morel in northerly MO under a cedar. I lived a while in OKC, OK and almost couldn't find a morel unless you were looking under cedars.
I think the cedars in areas with more surface rock produce others not so much. The areas in Okl and Kansas I have picked on cedar all had thin soil but a lot of dolomite. I literally picked out of nothing but needles on to of rock in many cases. The Ozarks have a similar setup. Of course I could be totally full of it also.
 

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Shroomsearcher, that all sound correct from my reading/investigations. As a curiosity, what do you think would happen if a live Elm were cut down to a stump? Is there enough left in the system to push morels in next few seasons? Not that I plan to cut any tree down, but I do have some Elm trunks along a site that got cut down. Haven't looked there (Yet!). There's no litter of limbs or bark because it got cleaned up after cutting them. But, the trunk and root system of course exist.
 

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I would think that if there is morel mycelium with a mycorrhizal relationship with that particular tree, it would sense the disaster that has befallen the tree, and that would cause it to flush morels. I think that's definitely a site worth checking. How long ago were the trees cut down? And I don't think lack of ground litter would matter at all. In fact, it would just make the morels easier to spot if they are there.
 

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I would think that if there is morel mycelium with a mycorrhizal relationship with that particular tree, it would sense the disaster that has befallen the tree, and that would cause it to flush morels. I think that's definitely a site worth checking. How long ago were the trees cut down? And I don't think lack of ground litter would matter at all. In fact, it would just make the morels easier to spot if they are there.
This is spot on.
The tried and true adage of searching around elm trees came to light primarily during the rampant progression of Dutch elm disease. While it is true that morels have an affinity for forming this mycorrhizal relationship with elms, they’ll be mutualistic with many other species as well.
Pay special attention to ash trees this season. As the emerald ash borer (EAB) brings destruction to this species, it does cause the morels to fruit prolifically in a last ditch effort to reproduce.
 

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Most of the Ozarks region is elm poor. I am not sure what they hunt on down there. I would look around streams if you can find some soft maple, cottonwood, or river birch on them they all produce. Young willow groves also. Some people say they find them in the oak/hickory timbers down there but I never have much luck in those type timbers up north.. If you drive over to the strip pits in SE. Kansas there are many acres of cottonwoods and some elm.
Sycamores down in the valleys will produce as well.
 

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For any new folks looking to find morels but not having a hard time identifying elm trees, I just wrote an article in my blog on how to identify elms. For folks who've been doing this a while, feel free to read what I wrote for perspective or a refresher. And if I missed something or you have other feedback...please let me know! Thanks folks! How to Find Buckets of Morels (how to identify elm trees!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
For any new folks looking to find morels but not having a hard time identifying elm trees, I just wrote an article in my blog on how to identify elms. For folks who've been doing this a while, feel free to read what I wrote for perspective or a refresher. And if I missed something or you have other feedback...please let me know! Thanks folks! How to Find Buckets of Morels (how to identify elm trees!)
I always tell folks go out and take a drive down any rural road. In early spring as now in N. MO. the elm are seeding and really stand out. You can get a good idea of bark patterns and branching patterns, which is what person needs to recognize for newly dead elm. The maples are seeding also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
Shroomsearcher, that all sound correct from my reading/investigations. As a curiosity, what do you think would happen if a live Elm were cut down to a stump? Is there enough left in the system to push morels in next few seasons? Not that I plan to cut any tree down, but I do have some Elm trunks along a site that got cut down. Haven't looked there (Yet!). There's no litter of limbs or bark because it got cleaned up after cutting them. But, the trunk and root system of course exist.
They will produce morels most likely. I have picked many on cut elm. Usually need to be cut the summer or autumn before. Produce 1-3 years.
 

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I always tell folks go out and take a drive down any rural road. In early spring as now in N. MO. the elm are seeding and really stand out. You can get a good idea of bark patterns and branching patterns, which is what person needs to recognize for newly dead elm. The maples are seeding also.
For sure, that's great advice!
 

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I would think that if there is morel mycelium with a mycorrhizal relationship with that particular tree, it would sense the disaster that has befallen the tree, and that would cause it to flush morels. I think that's definitely a site worth checking. How long ago were the trees cut down? And I don't think lack of ground litter would matter at all. In fact, it would just make the morels easier to spot if they are there.
Was 2+, maybe 3 yrs ago.
 

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Still worth a look I guess. I don't know if elms are a species that will sprout suckers from the roots, but if they do, that might be enough to keep the root system alive.
 

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For any new folks looking to find morels but not having a hard time identifying elm trees, I just wrote an article in my blog on how to identify elms. For folks who've been doing this a while, feel free to read what I wrote for perspective or a refresher. And if I missed something or you have other feedback...please let me know! Thanks folks! How to Find Buckets of Morels (how to identify elm trees!)
Very good read. I started tree hunting about 10 years ago and it improved my harvest greatly. Now my heart skips a beat every time I see that bark sliding off of an elm.
 

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Folks we just had two days in a row of 50+ degree soil temps 4" deep. Morels could start fruiting in the. next couple days...
37363
37364
 

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At least that's true in the southern part of the state. I'm a little worried it's going to get cold again at the end of april and this could make the season weird or less productive in May. Any thoughts on that from other folks?
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
At least that's true in the southern part of the state. I'm a little worried it's going to get cold again at the end of april and this could make the season weird or less productive in May. Any thoughts on that from other folks?
I think we are good to go ed. I live in NW.Mo and some smalls are up already. This rain was timed perfect. It never dropped below 60 the last 2 night. The babies will fruit under the leaves this weekend. I see no temps below freezing in the future. Mostly 60's/40's for the next 3 weeks with a couple of 70's tossed in. Looks to good to be true. Long season if the temps hold.
Very good read. I started tree hunting about 10 years ago and it improved my harvest greatly. Now my heart skips a beat every time I see that bark sliding off of an elm.
Never could understand folks just stumbling through timber and can't identify an ash, dead elm, cottonwood. If you want to be a serious hunter better not walk by to many 1st year dead elm. The money tree. Cottonwoods are just as good. Sometimes better. They tend to put up clusters for some reason. I think their shallow root structure has something to do with it
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
Sycamores can be really good producers one year and not much another....not sure why, it’s an enigma.
I have ash and maples that will do the same dawg. I may get a box out of a patch one year and wait 3 for some more. That is why the elm is still king if you want a jackpot in the hills. River bottom hunting has always been confusing unless a bunch of cottons have died. Me and a friend picked #40 out of yellow grass and stripling cottons a couple of years ago. Nothing dead tree wise. Never would have thought the spot would have morels in it. The last flood wiped it all out. Good luck on your hunt tomorrow, I think you will be frying the wife morels for dinner.
 
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