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Sorry, been quite for the past week but Im still finding them. Less and less each day as we get away from the rain we had last week. Got rain planned for the next few days so I expect to get another flush of them again. Probably over all found about 15lbs so far.
That's an amazing haul. I've been skunked so far. I've looked in some Elm, Sycamore, Ash habitat but haven't found any yet. I know of some cedar areas I'm planning to try next. I hope with last nights rain I can find some this week.
 

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I drove up to Lake Whitney (2 hours) yesterday but no luck. I just don't know what wooded areas I am allowed to be on so I went to the state park. There are only 2 small hiking trails so? I go off the trail but still nothing. It was a fun day anyway but yaknow. I am from the midwest and used to finding loads but here in TX IDK... Where I live in Williamson County there are tons of hiking trails but I know I need to go north a bit. There are some army corps lands around lake Whitney but they seems to be designated for hunting. I am looking for advice, wooded areas that I can go on without getting in too much trouble! Please and TY :)
One of my best spots is near Lake Whitney, but it has not produced this year. Our soils have been very dry, generally speaking, along the I-35 corridor. Northeast Texas, where you're seeing more reports of findings, has received significantly more rain than we have along I-35.

I was in Austin yesterday and found a single morel in a city park on the northwest side of town. (This site does not like it when you share specific locations.) A friend from Colorado also found a single morel elsewhere in the city. McCartney, Austin's morel guru (who does not participate on here), has reported isolated finds in Austin, and one good "honey hole," but states that this will not be a good season for South Texas due to lack of precip.

The big storm system that dumped rain across north-central Texas last night may trigger fruiting in the next week if temps don't get too high, so you might consider another trip to the Whitney area. (There is also Army Corps hunting land along nearby Lake Aquilla.) There are TONS of Army Corps parks around the lakes between you and Whitney, and I've found morels beneath junipers in most of them.

In terms of locations to hunt, foraging in State Parks is illegal, and there have actually been arrests in the past few years. Don't pick anything you find in a State Park. Any Army Corps land designated for public hunting or fishing is acceptable for mushroom hunting. Some select state-managed Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) will request that you get a recreational permit for hiking and camping to be on the property, but do not prohibit you from collecting mushrooms, and there are MANY of these. In East Texas, National Forest land is open for personal gathering of mushrooms (modest amounts for personal consumption) without a permit. Check individual National Wildlife refuges for their restrictions, some restrict it, some don't mention it at all. National Parks permit personal foraging, but I doubt you'll be headed that far west.

Within metro Austin, look for greenbelts that follow live creeks, there are TONS of them...morels there tend to fruit beneath juniper trees several feet above permanent or semi-permanent water sources (but not right along them.) The farther north you get along the I-35 corridor, your best luck will be to stick with junipers, and my best areas near Whitney produce on hilltops, rather than near water sources, but your mileage may vary.

As you approach the DFW metroplex and parts north, or venture further east, you can start checking the deciduous trees: elm, ash, cottonwood, sycamore. Some in East Texas report finds beneath oak. (I've never had luck beneath oak except in northwest Arkansas, where I regularly find them beneath oak.) But it will always be easiest to find juniper morels, regardless of your location, especially later in the season where their large size and bright yellow color makes them stand out like little lanterns under the juniper duff. (Note: many people on here will call these trees "cedars" but we have no true cedars in Texas, and although our most common juniper's non-scientific name is Eastern Redcedar, this is a misnomer.)

Good luck! And never forget that the journey is the destination... A day spent in the woods is a good day, whether you return home with mushrooms or not. Wild garlic/onion is everywhere this time of year, and makes a good consolation prize. I like to harvest just the flower stalk with the unopened bud, for sustainability purposes. (The bulb beneath the ground is small this time of year, and not worth digging up.) These wild onion flowers are out of this world delicious when sauteed with butter and salt. I used to serve them at my restaurant during this season and people flipped out over them. If you're not familiar with them, you'll know them by their unmistakable onion scent when you pick them. If it doesn't smell EXACTLY like an onion, it's not wild onion. "Crow poison," a poisonous look-alike, also grows and flowers around this time, but smells nothing like onion when picked.
 

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I think I could find a pickup load and would still want a count. Found 112 today that weighed almost 3 pounds. View attachment 37144
Wow! Greatness right there. My dad can't seem to find any amongst his mayapples in Mineola. He should go check out our land in Lindale off 69 near the Cowboy Church. Are we close to where you hunt? We're in year two of morel madness and still in search of our first one ever. 🤞
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
L


One of my best spots is near Lake Whitney, but it has not produced this year. Our soils have been very dry, generally speaking, along the I-35 corridor. Northeast Texas, where you're seeing more reports of findings, has received significantly more rain than we have along I-35.

I was in Austin yesterday and found a single morel in a city park on the northwest side of town. (This site does not like it when you share specific locations.) A friend from Colorado also found a single morel elsewhere in the city. McCartney, Austin's morel guru (who does not participate on here), has reported isolated finds in Austin, and one good "honey hole," but states that this will not be a good season for South Texas due to lack of precip.

The big storm system that dumped rain across north-central Texas last night may trigger fruiting in the next week if temps don't get too high, so you might consider another trip to the Whitney area. (There is also Army Corps hunting land along nearby Lake Aquilla.) There are TONS of Army Corps parks around the lakes between you and Whitney, and I've found morels beneath junipers in most of them.

In terms of locations to hunt, foraging in State Parks is illegal, and there have actually been arrests in the past few years. Don't pick anything you find in a State Park. Any Army Corps land designated for public hunting or fishing is acceptable for mushroom hunting. Some select state-managed Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) will request that you get a recreational permit for hiking and camping to be on the property, but do not prohibit you from collecting mushrooms, and there are MANY of these. In East Texas, National Forest land is open for personal gathering of mushrooms (modest amounts for personal consumption) without a permit. Check individual National Wildlife refuges for their restrictions, some restrict it, some don't mention it at all. National Parks permit personal foraging, but I doubt you'll be headed that far west.

Within metro Austin, look for greenbelts that follow live creeks, there are TONS of them...morels there tend to fruit beneath juniper trees several feet above permanent or semi-permanent water sources (but not right along them.) The farther north you get along the I-35 corridor, your best luck will be to stick with junipers, and my best areas near Whitney produce on hilltops, rather than near water sources, but your mileage may vary.

As you approach the DFW metroplex and parts north, or venture further east, you can start checking the deciduous trees: elm, ash, cottonwood, sycamore. Some in East Texas report finds beneath oak. (I've never had luck beneath oak except in northwest Arkansas, where I regularly find them beneath oak.) But it will always be easiest to find juniper morels, regardless of your location, especially later in the season where their large size and bright yellow color makes them stand out like little lanterns under the juniper duff. (Note: many people on here will call these trees "cedars" but we have no true cedars in Texas, and although our most common juniper's non-scientific name is Eastern Redcedar, this is a misnomer.)

Good luck! And never forget that the journey is the destination... A day spent in the woods is a good day, whether you return home with mushrooms or not. Wild garlic/onion is everywhere this time of year, and makes a good consolation prize. I like to harvest just the flower stalk with the unopened bud, for sustainability purposes. (The bulb beneath the ground is small this time of year, and not worth digging up.) These wild onion flowers are out of this world delicious when sauteed with butter and salt. I used to serve them at my restaurant during this season and people flipped out over them. If you're not familiar with them, you'll know them by their unmistakable onion scent when you pick them. If it doesn't smell EXACTLY like an onion, it's not wild onion. "Crow poison," a poisonous look-alike, also grows and flowers around this time, but smells nothing like onion when picked.
We have tons of wild onion on our place and they make a great addition to any pork dish or potato dish. Mostly roasted wild hog with morels....having a Homer Simpson drool moment....
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
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Another large haul. These were mostly found down in bottom areas but not in boggy areas. Higher ground in bottom areas around cedars and oaks. Seeing a lot around oaks in dark thick coverage. When this happens I know its almost over for the season. Oaks around here produce last for me.
 

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Wow! Greatness right there. My dad can't seem to find any amongst his mayapples in Mineola. He should go check out our land in Lindale off 69 near the Cowboy Church. Are we close to where you hunt? We're in year two of morel madness and still in search of our first one ever. 🤞
Not sure where the cowboy church is, but if you have woods there I would definitely check them out. I did find some a few days ago in mayapples, but most have come from elm trees dead and alive. Yesterday I found around 20 on a cedar that weren’t ready.
4D697F8D-A6CD-43C7-A07A-15976947B32A.jpeg
 

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One of my best spots is near Lake Whitney, but it has not produced this year. Our soils have been very dry, generally speaking, along the I-35 corridor. Northeast Texas, where you're seeing more reports of findings, has received significantly more rain than we have along I-35.

I was in Austin yesterday and found a single morel in a city park on the northwest side of town. (This site does not like it when you share specific locations.) A friend from Colorado also found a single morel elsewhere in the city. McCartney, Austin's morel guru (who does not participate on here), has reported isolated finds in Austin, and one good "honey hole," but states that this will not be a good season for South Texas due to lack of precip.

The big storm system that dumped rain across north-central Texas last night may trigger fruiting in the next week if temps don't get too high, so you might consider another trip to the Whitney area. (There is also Army Corps hunting land along nearby Lake Aquilla.) There are TONS of Army Corps parks around the lakes between you and Whitney, and I've found morels beneath junipers in most of them.

In terms of locations to hunt, foraging in State Parks is illegal, and there have actually been arrests in the past few years. Don't pick anything you find in a State Park. Any Army Corps land designated for public hunting or fishing is acceptable for mushroom hunting. Some select state-managed Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) will request that you get a recreational permit for hiking and camping to be on the property, but do not prohibit you from collecting mushrooms, and there are MANY of these. In East Texas, National Forest land is open for personal gathering of mushrooms (modest amounts for personal consumption) without a permit. Check individual National Wildlife refuges for their restrictions, some restrict it, some don't mention it at all. National Parks permit personal foraging, but I doubt you'll be headed that far west.

Within metro Austin, look for greenbelts that follow live creeks, there are TONS of them...morels there tend to fruit beneath juniper trees several feet above permanent or semi-permanent water sources (but not right along them.) The farther north you get along the I-35 corridor, your best luck will be to stick with junipers, and my best areas near Whitney produce on hilltops, rather than near water sources, but your mileage may vary.

As you approach the DFW metroplex and parts north, or venture further east, you can start checking the deciduous trees: elm, ash, cottonwood, sycamore. Some in East Texas report finds beneath oak. (I've never had luck beneath oak except in northwest Arkansas, where I regularly find them beneath oak.) But it will always be easiest to find juniper morels, regardless of your location, especially later in the season where their large size and bright yellow color makes them stand out like little lanterns under the juniper duff. (Note: many people on here will call these trees "cedars" but we have no true cedars in Texas, and although our most common juniper's non-scientific name is Eastern Redcedar, this is a misnomer.)

Good luck! And never forget that the journey is the destination... A day spent in the woods is a good day, whether you return home with mushrooms or not. Wild garlic/onion is everywhere this time of year, and makes a good consolation prize. I like to harvest just the flower stalk with the unopened bud, for sustainability purposes. (The bulb beneath the ground is small this time of year, and not worth digging up.) These wild onion flowers are out of this world delicious when sauteed with butter and salt. I used to serve them at my restaurant during this season and people flipped out over them. If you're not familiar with them, you'll know them by their unmistakable onion scent when you pick them. If it doesn't smell EXACTLY like an onion, it's not wild onion. "Crow poison," a poisonous look-alike, also grows and flowers around this time, but smells nothing like onion when picked.
Thank you SO much for sharing this useful information. It is very much appreciated!
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
With the rain and cooler weather we had over the weekend, new morels have popped up for me. Really thought is was it for the season but looks like we have another week to hunt. I need another freezer and a dehydrator.
 

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With the rain and cooler weather we had over the weekend, new morels have popped up for me. Really thought is was it for the season but looks like we have another week to hunt. I need another freezer and a dehydrator.
Good to hear the season continues, I hope to have the same problems with space in a couple of weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
Still finding them although slowing down a lot. The cooler weather has them still popping up. Need a rain and it will really get them going again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Well, though we might get lucky and get some more morels to pop out during this cooler weather we are having but nope.....have not found a morel in 2 weeks now....Dam...season over here in East Texas.
 
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