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My apologies for not getting this posted until this morning as an online auction I was participating in on Sun evening went way late. Please know and understand that none of this info is scientific and is simply my opinion based on 40 plus years of shroomin. If there is one thing I have learned about Morels its that whatever you think you know about them and it has worked for years will one day not be what you thought it was and it did not work this time. That has happened more times than I care to count. Keep in mind something that works in one area may not work in another. Each area has its own particulars however, many overlap and work in many places. That being said, the following is what I have observed this year. I write under this heading so as to not fill up any states page..

In the old days (30 to 40 years ago) in NE KS. around Thanksgiving it would start to freeze and by Christmas it was frozen solid and snow covered the ground until spring began usually in March. It took around 45 days to warm up from South to North and prime morel season began the last 2 weeks of April into the last 2 week of May. Never did it go from 10 below to 60 in the span of 15 days as it did this year. Never or rarely would temps hit mid 80s by Easter again as it did this year. In fact, those 80 degree temps is what brings an end to the season every year. A few short years ago Morel season had just began inn the Midwest when we has 2 85 degree days back to back. The few morels found were small and the end of season yellows with large webs. People could not figure it out and only one person who sold on this site was finding morels and he was finding large quantities. This year when the hot weather hit the morels had not began or were just starting. The few morels being found are from the sparce areas that did not get the hot temps such as North facing slopes partly or mostly shaded areas, or at elevations that again, did not get so hot. Which by the way is where the lone finder a few years ago found all of his it was found out. Do not give up all hope. Possibly your area that you hunt did not get the warm temps and if it did, there are always areas that are in shaded or lower elevations where it did not get so hot and those are the areas you want to be looking in. Years like this is when you have to study and hunt accordingly. One cant stumble out of your truck and start stepping on morels as many do in average years. This is the fun and the lure in hunting Morels, Trying to figure out where they are growing and then trying out your hunch. Nothing is more rewarding than finding the mother lode. I have saw grown adults giddy with excitement and act like little kids having so much fun finding quantities. Me included I must admit. Nothing is more frustrating than a long hunt and only finding a few or even worse getting skunked. Been there as well. Regardless, have fun and enjoy your hunt. I may be wrong on my suspicion that it got to hot to early this year and maybe all the recent rains cooled the soils enough to allow for the season to restart. One can always hope and I can assure you, no one hopes this is the case more than me. I have been wrong before and I am not ashamed to admit it.

The following is some things I have learned about Morels that have helped me find them. I will begin with some well known facts. Keep picked Morels cool and out of the direct sun. Never store or ship Morels in plastic or styrofoam as they need air circulation. Any portion of the morel that touches plastic of styrofoam will turn black. Never wash or rinse a picked Morel until you are ready to clean and eat it as this starts the rotting process. Only soak Morels after cutting them in half prior to eating in salt water for 30 mins to kill and bugs and rinse well then placing inside up on layers of newspaper to soak the excess water off. Do not add salt while cooking but rather after they are cooked. Cooking in butter seems to bring out flavors that cooking in oil does not but both have been used. Any JUDICIOUS tree can produce morels and soft wooded species such as elm. cotton wood, and sycamore as well as some fruit woods produce more. Morel spores are born when the morel grows and opens then spewing millions of spores into the wind. Morel spores are wind blown and can land and grow almost anywhere, even where a tree is not even in sight. Morel spores are light in weight similar to a very fine snow and they travel in the winds and fall to the ground again just as a fine snow flake does. This is the reason morels are found in grasses as well as around Pines when they cant produce them. Think back to winter. These are the same locations where fine snow piles up. Anything or anyplace that disrupts the wind will ultimately drop morel spores. Tall grasses such as CRP included without a tree to be found. I have personally saw a morel growing out of the side of a hedge post about a foot above the ground. The post was a year old and after falling when cut it had picked up a small amount of dirt caught behind the bark. Either the dirt contained a morel spore or the wind blew it there. In the 80s when the plastic bag became popular replacing the brown paper bag, everyone was using them to carry their finds in. As morels need to be kept cool and have air circulation the plastic bags in the hot sun was ruining the shelf life of Morels. I tried to explain this and nobody took it to heart. When I began telling people that using an onion or mesh bag would help spread the morel spores people began using them hoping the spreading of spores would encourage more growth. This has always kind of bothered me but I find solace knowing that if there would happen to be any viable spores left on a morel after being picked that the mesh bag would do as I suggested although it was not the reason that I encourages their use. It has however helped ten times fold in keeping the morels from cooking in the plastic and improved their shelf life immensely. It also helps to get rid of any dirt that may be left on stems when put in the bag as it allows for it to fall off and out. Always pinch or cut the stem roughly an inch above the ground leaving the base of the stem intact in the ground. Never pull the entire morel root and all and never put any dirt in your bag. Leave the stem and there will be a morel there next year. Morels are very sensitive to and most dependent on moisture but the temperature plays the controlling part of if and when morels grow. Morels do best in slowly gradual temperature increases and anytime they have began to grown and it gets too hot or freezes it will negatively affect their growth from that point forward. Ground temp is crucial as the fragile mycelium from which the morels sprout lies in the first inch of soil or so. If a soil temp map reading at 4 inches is 60 degrees, most likely the top inch is 70 plus degrees. Soil temp maps are taken in fields and have no direct correlation with the ground temp in a timber where trees shade a large portion of the surface. On an average year, more morels are found in draws, along rivers and streams and in bushes or even grass than are found in deep timbers, A year such as this may be just the opposite with the timber remaining cooler when all the other areas got to hot. On hot years go deep in elevation where it remained cool or deep in the woods where the same is observed. Every year there is always one freak spot where the sun shinned on the spot and warmed it up where numerous morels are found and all the areas around for a hundred miles have not even began. I have discovered that many hunters are not aware of the 4 different types of morels that grow every season but rather think there is only the big end of season yellows that you see pictured on a tailgate. Although those are alot of fun to find, the true morel hunter has already filled many a bag before the big yellows are ever found. The big yellows I have always thought are for kids to learn to hunt and enjoy the thrill of locating them. I mean really, how hard is it to walk into an area and spot bright yellow objects the size of a beer car. This does not make a true morel hunter but what is commonly known as a Stumbler for obvious reasons. The different ground temps dictate which color and kind of Morel grows. Often people say I found little greys next to medium tans next to big yellows all in the same spot. Very common in unhunted grounds. The greys are in the shade more and the yellows are in the sun. This is a prime example of the different and various micro-climates all in the same small area and exposes why soil temperature maps are virtually useless when it comes to Morels. The entire field or timber has these same micro-climates thus the various colors and sizes of morels found. Once the ground temperature continues to rise the smaller greys are no longer able to grow and the medium or larger sized tans and blondes are the norm. For the last few years in four states here in the Midwest I along with landowners have been researching the morel by helping Mother Nature suit Mankind in producing the wild morel. No spores or specimens of morels are planted but rather the natural things that encourage morel growth may be or conditions may be made to encourage their growth. The small plots are made in both direct sun and full shade as well as in natural timbers or draws. The results are varied but very encouraging and it is very clear that with minimal effort and at little or no cost, that Mother Nature can be tickled a bit to encourage her to help mankind in his quest for Morels. This also gives me an insight into what the growing conditions are and at what stage the season is in at different locations in the midwest. The results are truly amazing and with the dwindling areas to hunt Morels, I plan to begin a cost sharing program non-profit to implement the program to both individual land owners but also on Government lands. The processes has been approved by NRC and incorporates many of their recommended techniques. A website is envisioned where the program would be coordinated thru including cost sharing so as to not burden a landowner but reward them with years of morels. The Morel production and the program gets better every year as it scales and grows out. It appears to be a all natural win-win for all involved. There is more to share but at a later time and at a different place. Watch for a website. Happy hunting and may your finds be many.-SHROOMBUYER
 

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My apologies for not getting this posted until this morning as an online auction I was participating in on Sun evening went way late. Please know and understand that none of this info is scientific and is simply my opinion based on 40 plus years of shroomin. If there is one thing I have learned about Morels its that whatever you think you know about them and it has worked for years will one day not be what you thought it was and it did not work this time. That has happened more times than I care to count. Keep in mind something that works in one area may not work in another. Each area has its own particulars however, many overlap and work in many places. That being said, the following is what I have observed this year. I write under this heading so as to not fill up any states page..

In the old days (30 to 40 years ago) in NE KS. around Thanksgiving it would start to freeze and by Christmas it was frozen solid and snow covered the ground until spring began usually in March. It took around 45 days to warm up from South to North and prime morel season began the last 2 weeks of April into the last 2 week of May. Never did it go from 10 below to 60 in the span of 15 days as it did this year. Never or rarely would temps hit mid 80s by Easter again as it did this year. In fact, those 80 degree temps is what brings an end to the season every year. A few short years ago Morel season had just began inn the Midwest when we has 2 85 degree days back to back. The few morels found were small and the end of season yellows with large webs. People could not figure it out and only one person who sold on this site was finding morels and he was finding large quantities. This year when the hot weather hit the morels had not began or were just starting. The few morels being found are from the sparce areas that did not get the hot temps such as North facing slopes partly or mostly shaded areas, or at elevations that again, did not get so hot. Which by the way is where the lone finder a few years ago found all of his it was found out. Do not give up all hope. Possibly your area that you hunt did not get the warm temps and if it did, there are always areas that are in shaded or lower elevations where it did not get so hot and those are the areas you want to be looking in. Years like this is when you have to study and hunt accordingly. One cant stumble out of your truck and start stepping on morels as many do in average years. This is the fun and the lure in hunting Morels, Trying to figure out where they are growing and then trying out your hunch. Nothing is more rewarding than finding the mother lode. I have saw grown adults giddy with excitement and act like little kids having so much fun finding quantities. Me included I must admit. Nothing is more frustrating than a long hunt and only finding a few or even worse getting skunked. Been there as well. Regardless, have fun and enjoy your hunt. I may be wrong on my suspicion that it got to hot to early this year and maybe all the recent rains cooled the soils enough to allow for the season to restart. One can always hope and I can assure you, no one hopes this is the case more than me. I have been wrong before and I am not ashamed to admit it.

The following is some things I have learned about Morels that have helped me find them. I will begin with some well known facts. Keep picked Morels cool and out of the direct sun. Never store or ship Morels in plastic or styrofoam as they need air circulation. Any portion of the morel that touches plastic of styrofoam will turn black. Never wash or rinse a picked Morel until you are ready to clean and eat it as this starts the rotting process. Only soak Morels after cutting them in half prior to eating in salt water for 30 mins to kill and bugs and rinse well then placing inside up on layers of newspaper to soak the excess water off. Do not add salt while cooking but rather after they are cooked. Cooking in butter seems to bring out flavors that cooking in oil does not but both have been used. Any JUDICIOUS tree can produce morels and soft wooded species such as elm. cotton wood, and sycamore as well as some fruit woods produce more. Morel spores are born when the morel grows and opens then spewing millions of spores into the wind. Morel spores are wind blown and can land and grow almost anywhere, even where a tree is not even in sight. Morel spores are light in weight similar to a very fine snow and they travel in the winds and fall to the ground again just as a fine snow flake does. This is the reason morels are found in grasses as well as around Pines when they cant produce them. Think back to winter. These are the same locations where fine snow piles up. Anything or anyplace that disrupts the wind will ultimately drop morel spores. Tall grasses such as CRP included without a tree to be found. I have personally saw a morel growing out of the side of a hedge post about a foot above the ground. The post was a year old and after falling when cut it had picked up a small amount of dirt caught behind the bark. Either the dirt contained a morel spore or the wind blew it there. In the 80s when the plastic bag became popular replacing the brown paper bag, everyone was using them to carry their finds in. As morels need to be kept cool and have air circulation the plastic bags in the hot sun was ruining the shelf life of Morels. I tried to explain this and nobody took it to heart. When I began telling people that using an onion or mesh bag would help spread the morel spores people began using them hoping the spreading of spores would encourage more growth. This has always kind of bothered me but I find solace knowing that if there would happen to be any viable spores left on a morel after being picked that the mesh bag would do as I suggested although it was not the reason that I encourages their use. It has however helped ten times fold in keeping the morels from cooking in the plastic and improved their shelf life immensely. It also helps to get rid of any dirt that may be left on stems when put in the bag as it allows for it to fall off and out. Always pinch or cut the stem roughly an inch above the ground leaving the base of the stem intact in the ground. Never pull the entire morel root and all and never put any dirt in your bag. Leave the stem and there will be a morel there next year. Morels are very sensitive to and most dependent on moisture but the temperature plays the controlling part of if and when morels grow. Morels do best in slowly gradual temperature increases and anytime they have began to grown and it gets too hot or freezes it will negatively affect their growth from that point forward. Ground temp is crucial as the fragile mycelium from which the morels sprout lies in the first inch of soil or so. If a soil temp map reading at 4 inches is 60 degrees, most likely the top inch is 70 plus degrees. Soil temp maps are taken in fields and have no direct correlation with the ground temp in a timber where trees shade a large portion of the surface. On an average year, more morels are found in draws, along rivers and streams and in bushes or even grass than are found in deep timbers, A year such as this may be just the opposite with the timber remaining cooler when all the other areas got to hot. On hot years go deep in elevation where it remained cool or deep in the woods where the same is observed. Every year there is always one freak spot where the sun shinned on the spot and warmed it up where numerous morels are found and all the areas around for a hundred miles have not even began. I have discovered that many hunters are not aware of the 4 different types of morels that grow every season but rather think there is only the big end of season yellows that you see pictured on a tailgate. Although those are alot of fun to find, the true morel hunter has already filled many a bag before the big yellows are ever found. The big yellows I have always thought are for kids to learn to hunt and enjoy the thrill of locating them. I mean really, how hard is it to walk into an area and spot bright yellow objects the size of a beer car. This does not make a true morel hunter but what is commonly known as a Stumbler for obvious reasons. The different ground temps dictate which color and kind of Morel grows. Often people say I found little greys next to medium tans next to big yellows all in the same spot. Very common in unhunted grounds. The greys are in the shade more and the yellows are in the sun. This is a prime example of the different and various micro-climates all in the same small area and exposes why soil temperature maps are virtually useless when it comes to Morels. The entire field or timber has these same micro-climates thus the various colors and sizes of morels found. Once the ground temperature continues to rise the smaller greys are no longer able to grow and the medium or larger sized tans and blondes are the norm. For the last few years in four states here in the Midwest I along with landowners have been researching the morel by helping Mother Nature suit Mankind in producing the wild morel. No spores or specimens of morels are planted but rather the natural things that encourage morel growth may be or conditions may be made to encourage their growth. The small plots are made in both direct sun and full shade as well as in natural timbers or draws. The results are varied but very encouraging and it is very clear that with minimal effort and at little or no cost, that Mother Nature can be tickled a bit to encourage her to help mankind in his quest for Morels. This also gives me an insight into what the growing conditions are and at what stage the season is in at different locations in the midwest. The results are truly amazing and with the dwindling areas to hunt Morels, I plan to begin a cost sharing program non-profit to implement the program to both individual land owners but also on Government lands. The processes has been approved by NRC and incorporates many of their recommended techniques. A website is envisioned where the program would be coordinated thru including cost sharing so as to not burden a landowner but reward them with years of morels. The Morel production and the program gets better every year as it scales and grows out. It appears to be a all natural win-win for all involved. There is more to share but at a later time and at a different place. Watch for a website. Happy hunting and may your finds be many.-SHROOMBUYER
Sounds like Jaime. Is that you bud? Sure are killing them in Ok. at this moment. Been way over 80 and little rain in many in these areas for multiple days. Good infor. on a lot of different stuff. Only time will tell on the season. I agree on the microclimates 100% which is part of the picking in Okl. at the moment. Have to be in the right spots. I picked on a south facing slope elm yesterday in NW.Mo , as I should have. Many other tiny ones still growing. Never could figure out why anyone would pull them out dirt and all. What a mess. Hope your suspicions are wrong on the heat because the next 2-3 weeks looks pretty good. Good luck on the buying.
 

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Sounds like Jaime. Is that you bud? Sure are killing them in Ok. at this moment. Been way over 80 and little rain in many in these areas for multiple days. Good infor. on a lot of different stuff. Only time will tell on the season. I agree on the microclimates 100% which is part of the picking in Okl. at the moment. Have to be in the right spots. I picked on a south facing slope elm yesterday in NW.Mo , as I should have. Many other tiny ones still growing. Never could figure out why anyone would pull them out dirt and all. What a mess. Hope your suspicions are wrong on the heat because the next 2-3 weeks looks pretty good. Good luck on the buying.
Sorry to disappoint you KB but it Paul. I have went by SHROOMBUYER for ten years or so. I was told Jamie is in rehab from a lightning strike but have not confirmed or heard from him. I wish him well should he happen to read this. What little has and is been found in OK are all greys due to their location ie cedars(last cool spot before end of season) and deep. Very few blondes which is a tell tale sign that the morels were at least in part if not most sun. Less than 600 lbs have been picked in a roughly 300 mile area of Northern TX to mid OK when average years at this time there is usually around 5,000 lbs. Even worse less than 100 lbs have been picked from central OK North to the Canadian border with most coming from Central NE.I hardly consider that killing them but to each their own as far as opinions. Precociously why I stated in my post it was my opinion and nothing more. One would think you would have better luck even road hunting than listening to mostly novices on discussion boards who often post previous years pics but to each their own I guess. Kind of have to chuckle as far as you picking yesterday where you said you did as I am inclined to go by the old standard on here that talk is cheap and dated photos dont lie. Just a fyi, before you make statements that you were somewhere at a certain time you may want to check out the tracking feature on this site that not only tells everyone if you are on the site but it timestamps and pin points your exact location you are looking at on the site as well. Not saying you didnt, just saying its kinda hard to be in two places at once. anyways....keep on snoopin them boards, your bound to find some somewhere. Best of luck to ya!
 

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Sorry to disappoint you KB but it Paul. I have went by SHROOMBUYER for ten years or so. I was told Jamie is in rehab from a lightning strike but have not confirmed or heard from him. I wish him well should he happen to read this. What little has and is been found in OK are all greys due to their location ie cedars(last cool spot before end of season) and deep. Very few blondes which is a tell tale sign that the morels were at least in part if not most sun. Less than 600 lbs have been picked in a roughly 300 mile area of Northern TX to mid OK when average years at this time there is usually around 5,000 lbs. Even worse less than 100 lbs have been picked from central OK North to the Canadian border with most coming from Central NE.I hardly consider that killing them but to each their own as far as opinions. Precociously why I stated in my post it was my opinion and nothing more. One would think you would have better luck even road hunting than listening to mostly novices on discussion boards who often post previous years pics but to each their own I guess. Kind of have to chuckle as far as you picking yesterday where you said you did as I am inclined to go by the old standard on here that talk is cheap and dated photos dont lie. Just a fyi, before you make statements that you were somewhere at a certain time you may want to check out the tracking feature on this site that not only tells everyone if you are on the site but it timestamps and pin points your exact location you are looking at on the site as well. Not saying you didnt, just saying its kinda hard to be in two places at once. anyways....keep on snoopin them boards, your bound to find some somewhere. Best of luck to ya!
Dude did I insult you in some way? All I did was share a different perspective. Never said you were wrong. I agree a down year, hot and dry at the wrong time. I have a buddy who will buy #200 down there most likely today. You are only counting the morels you know of. They did come out in quantity in areas that many were not looking in. Not the usual spots is all I can say. If you are not Jamie then you must be related in some way, cause you both get hurt feelings real fast. I picked where I live yesterday, NW Mo. Reread my post before calling me a liar, as you did twice. Dated pictures, dude I am 61 and been doing this my entire life. Don't believe, don't care. Another perfect 2 lbs on a perfect east facing elm today, not north. I actually like talking with some of the novices you seem to dislike. These are the folks who will bust their butts in the timber and some day be good at it. So your prediction is the season is over from Texas to the Canadian border just to make sure we are clear? As I said in my first post that got you all side waze. I hope you are wrong.
 

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Dude did I insult you in some way? All I did was share a different perspective. Never said you were wrong. I agree a down year, hot and dry at the wrong time. I have a buddy who will buy #200 down there most likely today. You are only counting the morels you know of. They did come out in quantity in areas that many were not looking in. Not the usual spots is all I can say. If you are not Jamie then you must be related in some way, cause you both get hurt feelings real fast. I picked where I live yesterday, NW Mo. Reread my post before calling me a liar, as you did twice. Dated pictures, dude I am 61 and been doing this my entire life. Don't believe, don't care. Another perfect 2 lbs on a perfect east facing elm today, not north. I actually like talking with some of the novices you seem to dislike. These are the folks who will bust their butts in the timber and some day be good at it. So your prediction is the season is over from Texas to the Canadian border just to make sure we are clear? As I said in my first post that got you all side waze. I hope you are wrong.
KB- no need to assume anything on my end as we both know what that does. You didnt offend me one bit. By your reply it looks like you are the one upset although that was not my intention and I tried to be cordial. The quantities I spoke of are not just the ones I know of, its the ones I have viewed that were harvested-not told about. I never once said the season was over from TX to Canada, nor did I call you a liar. I simply stated that you cant be picking morels when you stated as this site showed you replying and reading on this site at that time. I will be going by your place tomorrow and I will see if you are around just to show you I harbor no ill will. Kind of weird to see Morels being picked in Michigan and Minnesota and they are just starting in St.joe. Thats a tough one to square in any season and it appears there is a reason for it that we both may agree on. To be clear, it s my opinion that the hot weather experienced around Easter in the midwest has greatly negatively affected the morel season therein. Re-reading my post will give one an idea where morels in this area are being found and where you can mostly likely find a mess to eat. As for posting dated pics of questionable claims, I stated it appears to be the standard norm on here and made no mention of not believing you.. As we all know, anyone can say anything but when they post that dated pic it shows they aren`t just blowing alot of hot air and removes all doubt. We all know how the fish stories go...No hard feelings here. Regards.
 

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It is an integral part of the analytics of this site and is no secret. Rest assured it is not a privacy violation as you agreed to the terms of service to use this site. I suggest you dont review you cell phones term of service as it allows for the company and its 2000 plus vendors to listen in and view and share all of your pics, conversations, your location down to the square foot of which floor in a building you are or were in, not to mention where you are or have been including shroom hunting. Even how long you were everywhere you went or are- both past and present. All cell phone and website TOS are the same. Thats why you get the privileges' to use them. At least this site is free. Some sites and cell phones make you pay them to collect all of your info. Regards
 

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KB- no need to assume anything on my end as we both know what that does. You didnt offend me one bit. By your reply it looks like you are the one upset although that was not my intention and I tried to be cordial. The quantities I spoke of are not just the ones I know of, its the ones I have viewed that were harvested-not told about. I never once said the season was over from TX to Canada, nor did I call you a liar. I simply stated that you cant be picking morels when you stated as this site showed you replying and reading on this site at that time. I will be going by your place tomorrow and I will see if you are around just to show you I harbor no ill will. Kind of weird to see Morels being picked in Michigan and Minnesota and they are just starting in St.joe. Thats a tough one to square in any season and it appears there is a reason for it that we both may agree on. To be clear, it s my opinion that the hot weather experienced around Easter in the midwest has greatly negatively affected the morel season therein. Re-reading my post will give one an idea where morels in this area are being found and where you can mostly likely find a mess to eat. As for posting dated pics of questionable claims, I stated it appears to be the standard norm on here and made no mention of not believing you.. As we all know, anyone can say anything but when they post that dated pic it shows they aren`t just blowing alot of hot air and removes all doubt. We all know how the fish stories go...No hard feelings here. Regards.
Word games. You must be confused or something, or misread my post. I picked morels in the place I live at about 4 PM. yesterday. Where do you think I said I picked them, or was, or whatever? Confusing. But still the same, don't call me a liar based on your confusion. If the tech. shows differently than it is not working correctly. Guess I don't hang with guys that make up fish stories, so the picture crap means nothing. Tend to trust people. You coming by my house? Not a good idea. Trust Me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Are JUDICIOUS trees the same as DECIDUOUS trees? Asking for a friend
L O L. That is too funny and kind of embarrassing at the same time. May have to look into spell checker, but regardless, thanks for pointing out the mis-spelling. When I was researching the matter I came across some info that I was not aware of and I am sure many others are of the same thinking. I will copy an paste the info below but to sum it up cedar trees are not conifers so can produce Morels. I had thought all along that cedar trees were conifers same as other pines and could not produce Morels. Some of the info I am not real comfortable with such as it states that Elm is a hardwood. I guess red elm is but I think of elms as being the soft Chinese elm most often saw here in KS. Couple other things they say are questionable as they state elms keep their leaves year round and some trees with needles are deciduous but no doubt they are alot more knowledgeable than me. I am going to have to do some more research on the trees as the info is different from what I learned. Any way here it is and thanks again for pointing out my mistake.

Deciduous Trees
Deciduous refers to any tree that drops its leaves in the fall and goes dormant during cold weather. When the weather warms, deciduous trees produce new leaves. Although most deciduous trees are broadleaf trees, this in not always the case. Some trees with needles are also deciduous trees.
Coniferous Trees
Coniferous trees are often referred to as evergreens, and the name is associated with trees that have needles instead of broad, flat leaves. Although this is true in many cases, it isn't always true. A coniferous tree is any tree that reproduces via cones.

Evergreens are plants that maintain their leaves in all seasons and include trees such as elm, pine, and cedar. Deciduous trees lose their leaves seasonally and include trees such as mango and maple. Hardwoods reproduce using flowers and have broad leaves: hardwoods include trees such as cedar, elm, and pine.
 

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Word games. You must be confused or something, or misread my post. I picked morels in the place I live at about 4 PM. yesterday. Where do you think I said I picked them, or was, or whatever? Confusing. But still the same, don't call me a liar based on your confusion. If the tech. shows differently than it is not working correctly. Guess I don't hang with guys that make up fish stories, so the picture crap means nothing. Tend to trust people. You coming by my house? Not a good idea. Trust Me.
Exactly. What does anyone have to gain by posting false pics and making up stories?
In fact I only see one person here that is trying to profit from their posts.
 
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