Morel Mushrooms and Mushroom Hunting banner
1281 - 1300 of 1333 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
2,486 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1,281 ·
So, I observed one anomaly this season up here, and I'm curious to see if anybody else noticed.

Some of you know that I love hunting ash trees...they're usually my bread and butter during morel season. This year, they were off...why is that? Well, I began to see a pattern. All the ash around me woke up like they usually do...the lower-hanging branches filled in only a little late this year, and the bottom half of my trees have had leaves for weeks. That said, the tops of the ash trees didn't even start to bloom until about 10-14 days ago. I noticed it with the ash in my backyard, then saw the same thing with the tall perimeter and canopy ash in forests. Most everywhere I have driven this past week, I've seen the same thing...a filled in canopy with the exception of ash trees still blooming. I have to go outside today and blow the petals off of the deck because it's covered.

Last year wasn't like that, and I had a good season...with ash trees leading the way. Coincidence, or am I onto something?
Oh You are on to something.. I'm always tryn to notice and consider the way it's all happening around me...and confirm facts and some Maybes and I Love thinking and gathering the informational pieces of The Mystery..
Still I know just as quickly as I notice and learn something... then it changes just a little or completely different...
And Once again Prevails what I will always Love
Is that " The Mystery Will Always Be "
and isn't it a Wonderful thing for us ...
" Love The Hunt " 🤠✌
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
Oh You are on to something.. I'm always tryn to notice and consider the way it's all happening around me...and confirm facts and some Maybes and I Love thinking and gathering the informational pieces of The Mystery..
Still I know just as quickly as I notice and learn something... then it changes just a little or completely different...
And Once again Prevails what I will always Love
Is that " The Mystery Will Always Be "
and isn't it a Wonderful thing for us ...
" Love The Hunt " 🤠✌
I read what I posted, and I want to clarify that it isn't EVERY ash tree, but more like 1 in 2 or 3. The trees that have room to grow horizontally are more noticeable.

Mine get a lot of sun, yet they do this to some extent every year...the bottom half will already have leaves before the top half begins to bloom. That said, it usually happens sooner, and without as much time in between. The mess of petals I just cleaned up usually occurs when I'm still finding yellows.

Last year was a great year (for me) for ash, and this year it was mostly poplar. I think you're right, @wade...there might be something to it. I'm gonna pay close attention next season. Who knows, maybe it'll be the year of the elm, and we all get paid handsomely :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
It wasn't long after I learned to identify ash trees that the emerald ash borer hit Ohio. It made short work of our ash trees! It took maybe 2 or 3 years, and they were all gone! Not much of a window to hunt in!
One thing I've been encouraged by is the fact that I've been seeing a lot of ash saplings the past couple years. It's going to be a while, but I think they'll make a comeback.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
@jim_t57 & @emarler

Okay, so this is a compilation of notes. There is room for experimentaion with the amount of beeswax, and additional infused items. I'll bring them up as I go along.

Lemon Balm Recipe

1)
If you don't already have lemon balm growing, there are online sites that sell dried lemon balm. If you go this route, you might also consider calendula flowers or plantain leaves in addition to the lemon balm.

If you do have fresh lemon balm, you're going to want to dry it out. Too much water can spoil the product over time. Take the leaves and spread them out on paper towels for about a week or so, until the leaves are completely dried out.

2)
Take the dried leaves and fill a heat-proof jar (I use mason jars) close to 1/3 of the way. Slowly pour a carrier oil over the leaves until the jar is nearly full. There are multiple oils that will work here. See notes

A) Seal the jar and let it sit for at least a few weeks...I usually do it for four to six when I make it this way...I'd say a minimum of two weeks. You want to move/shake the contents every day or two to help mix it together. This will make it stronger.

B) For a quicker infused oil, don't cover the jar, but instead place it in a small saucepan filled with several inches of water (double-boiler). Heat over a low to medium-low burner for 2 to 3 hours. Don't let it burn...stir occasionally.

Once the oil is infused, strain it...I use cheesecloth. Then, you can store it for 9 months-1 year. Keep it in a cool, dry place. I've kept it in both the refrigerator and cabinets in the past.

3)
To make the salve, I generally use 1 ounce of beeswax per 1 cup of oil. You may use more/less depending on how firm you want the salve to be. It usually ends up somewhere between 3.5-4.0:1 oil:wax

You will need a double boiler again...place a glass or ceramic bowl on top of a pan of boiling water. Gently heat the oil before slowly adding the beeswax. Stir (whisk) the contents well, until you have the consistency you want.

Once it is taken of the heat and had cooled slightly, this is when you'll want to add any essential oils or vitamin E...mix together.

Pour into the containers you want to use, and allow them to cool before sealing. I use small screw-top tins. I store them in the refrigerator. They should easily last a year or more.



NOTES
Almond oil, olive oil, grapeseed oil, and sunflower oil all work well as carrier oils. Coconut oil is not recommended because it hardens and isn't as easy to apply. I like almond oil, but it's more expensive...I have used olive and sunflower oils with success.

Some people add shea butter. If you do, less oil should be used. It'd be more like 3 parts oil, 1 part butter, and 1 part beeswax.

You may subsitute and/or infuse other remedies. I often add a little calendula oil. Every once in a while, I put small amounts of other things like honey or vitamin E in with the mix. Here are some other possible additives:

Castor oil - for more gloss and ease in application
Tamanu oil - helps skin conditions
Tea Tree oil - antiviral properties
Peppermint essential oil - analgesic/smell enhancement
Clove bud oil - pain relief
Calendula oil - heals skin ailments/antiviral
Honey - sterile/healing properties

You don't need to add very much of any of these remedies, and you'll have to experiment with amounts. Things like clove bud, tea tree, and peppermint only take drops...the rest I'd use teaspoons or tablespoons as measurement, depending on how much you are making.

If you use honey or calendula oil, add it when you are heating/mixing the beeswax and oil together. Use the others once it is taken off the heat.

For containers, you can find some small screw-top ones (metal/plastic) on Amazon or Ebay. Hobby Lobby has some round, plastic screw-top containers for jewelry that will work, but they are a little more expensive

Man Regionaire, I just spent a few minutes researching Lemon balm. Terrific health benefits!! seams like it could be just what the" herbalist " not doctor ,ordered to get my life back on track! Anxiety is a big problem for me and it sounds like drinking a tea twice a day has a calming effect. And that is just one advantage to it. Gonna plant some in a pot or two to keep it from taking over . Who knows it could be that it needs to take over. May add some Elderberry flowers or berries from my garden to a tea blend.
Thanks again!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
Man Regionaire, I just spent a few minutes researching Lemon balm. Terrific health benefits!! seams like it could be just what the" herbalist " not doctor ,ordered to get my life back on track! Anxiety is a big problem for me and it sounds like drinking a tea twice a day has a calming effect. And that is just one advantage to it. Gonna plant some in a pot or two to keep it from taking over . Who knows it could be that it needs to take over. May add some Elderberry flowers or berries from my garden to a tea blend.
Thanks again!!
Glad I could help! It's one of those super-plants that doesn't get the attention it deserves.

If you have a spot that is pretty well shaded, it doesn't grow out of control. Mine only gets morning sun, and pretty much stays right where it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
178 Posts
@jim_t57 & @emarler

Okay, so this is a compilation of notes. There is room for experimentaion with the amount of beeswax, and additional infused items. I'll bring them up as I go along.

Lemon Balm Recipe

1)
If you don't already have lemon balm growing, there are online sites that sell dried lemon balm. If you go this route, you might also consider calendula flowers or plantain leaves in addition to the lemon balm.

If you do have fresh lemon balm, you're going to want to dry it out. Too much water can spoil the product over time. Take the leaves and spread them out on paper towels for about a week or so, until the leaves are completely dried out.

2)
Take the dried leaves and fill a heat-proof jar (I use mason jars) close to 1/3 of the way. Slowly pour a carrier oil over the leaves until the jar is nearly full. There are multiple oils that will work here. See notes

A) Seal the jar and let it sit for at least a few weeks...I usually do it for four to six when I make it this way...I'd say a minimum of two weeks. You want to move/shake the contents every day or two to help mix it together. This will make it stronger.

B) For a quicker infused oil, don't cover the jar, but instead place it in a small saucepan filled with several inches of water (double-boiler). Heat over a low to medium-low burner for 2 to 3 hours. Don't let it burn...stir occasionally.

Once the oil is infused, strain it...I use cheesecloth. Then, you can store it for 9 months-1 year. Keep it in a cool, dry place. I've kept it in both the refrigerator and cabinets in the past.

3)
To make the salve, I generally use 1 ounce of beeswax per 1 cup of oil. You may use more/less depending on how firm you want the salve to be. It usually ends up somewhere between 3.5-4.0:1 oil:wax

You will need a double boiler again...place a glass or ceramic bowl on top of a pan of boiling water. Gently heat the oil before slowly adding the beeswax. Stir (whisk) the contents well, until you have the consistency you want.

Once it is taken of the heat and had cooled slightly, this is when you'll want to add any essential oils or vitamin E...mix together.

Pour into the containers you want to use, and allow them to cool before sealing. I use small screw-top tins. I store them in the refrigerator. They should easily last a year or more.



NOTES
Almond oil, olive oil, grapeseed oil, and sunflower oil all work well as carrier oils. Coconut oil is not recommended because it hardens and isn't as easy to apply. I like almond oil, but it's more expensive...I have used olive and sunflower oils with success.

Some people add shea butter. If you do, less oil should be used. It'd be more like 3 parts oil, 1 part butter, and 1 part beeswax.

You may subsitute and/or infuse other remedies. I often add a little calendula oil. Every once in a while, I put small amounts of other things like honey or vitamin E in with the mix. Here are some other possible additives:

Castor oil - for more gloss and ease in application
Tamanu oil - helps skin conditions
Tea Tree oil - antiviral properties
Peppermint essential oil - analgesic/smell enhancement
Clove bud oil - pain relief
Calendula oil - heals skin ailments/antiviral
Honey - sterile/healing properties

You don't need to add very much of any of these remedies, and you'll have to experiment with amounts. Things like clove bud, tea tree, and peppermint only take drops...the rest I'd use teaspoons or tablespoons as measurement, depending on how much you are making.

If you use honey or calendula oil, add it when you are heating/mixing the beeswax and oil together. Use the others once it is taken off the heat.

For containers, you can find some small screw-top ones (metal/plastic) on Amazon or Ebay. Hobby Lobby has some round, plastic screw-top containers for jewelry that will work, but they are a little more expensive
Wow! Thank you so much!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
Wow! Thank you so much!!!
Sure thing!

I just found 10 lbs of dried lemon balm I stashed last year, so I'll probably make a batch or two this week. After that, I'll mix up some more and let it infuse the old-fashioned way for a month.

This time around, I'm using sunflower, tea tree and castor oils, and powdered calendula flowers. I'd be using clove bud too, but I couldn't find any in the stores...I also have some peppermint, but I have to find it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
I hate to come off as being a conspiracy theorist but these chem trails we are seeing every day are not normal. Since they are in perfect grid patterns to get maximum coverage. I pray we are all not getting sick from this crap that's spewing out of them. As I say this I look outside and don't see a single one today. First time in months! First bluebird day I 've seen lately . I'm going to go out and bask in it's beauty.
Guess they must not be flying today, since they say it's normal to have "condensation fumes". Temps must be perfect today. lol. Stay safe out there.
link:
Remember-when-weather-manipulation-was-seen-as-a-kooky-conspiracy-theory?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
832 Posts
So, I observed one anomaly this season up here, and I'm curious to see if anybody else noticed.

Some of you know that I love hunting ash trees...they're usually my bread and butter during morel season. This year, they were off...why is that? Well, I began to see a pattern. All the ash around me woke up like they usually do...the lower-hanging branches filled in only a little late this year, and the bottom half of my trees have had leaves for weeks. That said, the tops of the ash trees didn't even start to bloom until about 10-14 days ago. I noticed it with the ash in my backyard, then saw the same thing with the tall perimeter and canopy ash in forests. Most everywhere I have driven this past week, I've seen the same thing...a filled in canopy with the exception of ash trees still blooming. I have to go outside today and blow the petals off of the deck because it's covered.

Last year wasn't like that, and I had a good season...with ash trees leading the way. Coincidence, or am I onto something?
I found zero morels by ash trees this year whereas I usually do fairly good.

As you probably already know, there are intricate (and often not clearly understood)
relationships between trees and fungi. So you may be onto something here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
832 Posts
I think I just learned that Dutch Elm Disease (DED) is a fungus. I always thought it was from some bug. Turns out a bug carries the fungus to the tree!

It's weird cuz I often hear about how elm trees and ash trees are in trouble due to their respective maladies.

However, I think some elm and ash trees are adapting to their attackers. In fact, I hunt an elm forest with gorgeous large healthy trees and wonder how is it they are just fine? While others right next to them aren't. It could have to do with the overall health of the tree and maybe even other neighboring fungi.

It seems to be complicated like COVID: Someone gets it and it ends their life, and others get it and barely know they have it.

The mysteries continue folks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
I found zero morels by ash trees this year whereas I usually do fairly good.

As you probably already know, there are intricate (and often not clearly understood)
relationships between trees and fungi. So you may be onto something here.
My ash tree total was less than 10% of what it was last year. Stupid me,I should've moved on to poplar sooner rather than continuously checking my ash stash.

I passed a couple small forests near subdivisions today and saw groups of canopy and perimeter ash still blooming! It wasn't just the north sides, either. In addition, the ones still blooming were in mostly in groups of 6-8 or more, and appeared to be getting a lot of sun. Crazy $#!t
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
I think I just learned that Dutch Elm Disease (DED) is a fungus. I always thought it was from some bug. Turns out a bug carries the fungus to the tree!

It's weird cuz I often hear about how elm trees and ash trees are in trouble due to their respective maladies.

However, I think some elm and ash trees are adapting to their attackers. In fact, I hunt an elm forest with gorgeous large healthy trees and wonder how is it they are just fine? While others right next to them aren't. It could have to do with the overall health of the tree and maybe even other neighboring fungi.

It seems to be complicated like COVID: Someone gets it and it ends their life, and others get it and barely know they have it.

The mysteries continue folks!
Even moreso than ash, I'm seeing baby elms everywhere I go. Like the ash, there's a lot of old ones coming down, but the new growth is encouraging. The biggest reason I want to spend more time in Berrien County is the beautiful elms
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,160 Posts
I think I just learned that Dutch Elm Disease (DED) is a fungus. I always thought it was from some bug. Turns out a bug carries the fungus to the tree!

It's weird cuz I often hear about how elm trees and ash trees are in trouble due to their respective maladies.

However, I think some elm and ash trees are adapting to their attackers. In fact, I hunt an elm forest with gorgeous large healthy trees and wonder how is it they are just fine? While others right next to them aren't. It could have to do with the overall health of the tree and maybe even other neighboring fungi.

It seems to be complicated like COVID: Someone gets it and it ends their life, and others get it and barely know they have it.

The mysteries continue folks!
I read this quite a few ago. Elm trees become sexually mature before they are subject to any effects from Dutch Elm Disease. So, they will produce seed before they get sick, so there will always be young elms around. Also, it seems that there is usually some percentage of any population subjected to a new disease vector that will be, if not immune, at least resistant to it. Heck, there are still some American chestnut trees around
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
I read this quite a few ago. Elm trees become sexually mature before they are subject to any effects from Dutch Elm Disease. So, they will produce seed before they get sick, so there will always be young elms around. Also, it seems that there is usually some percentage of any population subjected to a new disease vector that will be, if not immune, at least resistant to it. Heck, there are still some American chestnut trees around
I think the trees will be ok . Seeds survive quite a while , They just have to have the right conditions to germinate. Till up some new ground and you will have weed seeds come up that you have never seen before. In my experience if an elm gets any kind of damage to it's bark it's subject to disease . I usually see drill holes in the trunk as the first indicator that an insect or whatever bores into them has attacked it. Usually it dies shortly after. I found where an elm that someone had put tree steps in in the previous fall to put a tree stand. I found mushrooms under it the following spring. Loggers heavy equipment scar an elm, damage the bark , prime tree to keep an eye on. Just a few observations from my long morel hunting experience. My only experience is in south central In. Cannot speak for anywhere else. Just trying to contribute to the future generations of morel hunters. It has given me many ,many hours of enjoyment. Success is great but being in touch with nature is the real reward. I have enjoyed gleaning information and sharing what I've learned. This season was a test on most of the hunters here. Learn from this and pass it on if you want. If not that is totally up to you. Shroom on!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
Hey, @wade & @Kokomorel, I was cleaning the garage out and came across this old meter. It measures light, pH, and moisture levels in the soil...seems to work pretty well. I'm gonna try to experiment with it next spring to see if we come up with any new morel patterns. I'm posting this because I have a terrible memory and might need a reminder to bring it with me.

Green Rectangle Measuring instrument Gas Temperature
 

·
Super Moderator
Summer and fall shrooms are my addictions
Joined
·
719 Posts
Hey, @wade & @Kokomorel, I was cleaning the garage out and came across this old meter. It measures light, pH, and moisture levels in the soil...seems to work pretty well. I'm gonna try to experiment with it next spring to see if we come up with any new morel patterns. I'm posting this because I have a terrible memory and might need a reminder to bring it with me.

View attachment 43896
Very cool
 
1281 - 1300 of 1333 Posts
Top