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Discussion Starter #1
I was thinking it might be a Goldstack Boletus or a Penny Cap Bun.

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Discussion Starter #3
I picked many of these last year they did turn blue when I cut them. I actually prepared and consumed them twice along with other family members. We did not experience any side effects. Maybe its because I boiled it before cooking. They do resemble the Boletus Subvelutipes I want to get a pore print on the next one I find.
 

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I'd say its C. craniformis / C. cyathiformis, however, you said it was growing on the side of a Beech tree. If that tree still has them growing on it, take a picture of it and send it to Mushroom Observer. Here's the link. You have to join it, but it's free. Excellent site too!
http://mushroomobserver.org/
 

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Not c craniformis they were hanging like tear drops . They have a very thin skin they're soft those dents are finger prints I can't find anything like them. Think I will take your advice if I can locate the tree.
 

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http://www.mushroomexpert.com/boletus_campestris.html

http://dreams.smugmug.com/keyword/porcini/1/i-pgtnP9h

You can also tap your tongue on its flesh when cut in half and if its bitter its no good....but from the looks of it it looks like a delicious bolete ....does it turn blue slowly?

 

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oh not sure why the picture showed and not the link.... u can click on the pic and it will take u to web site
 

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Thanks Admin for sharing its name with us. I never read about this shroom and i am reading first time about it. Nice to see its picture.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
No its not bitter and its not red pored. Didn't find any this year and don't remember whether it turned blue slowly from what I recall it turned blue instantly. Ate plenty of them and nobody ever had any side effects from it. I took many pictures of different mushrooms while hiking and I left a gold mine of lobsters, honeys, oysters, and other various edible mushrooms behind because I didn't know what they were. Now I have various websites and books I can cross reference and get a positive ID on most of the mushrooms without doing a spore print but I still cant but my finger on the name of this Bolete I posted on this form. The Bolete in the picture above is a choice edible in many European countries but I cant get a translation to figure out what they are called in the states.
 

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Yes I am from Austria and used to mushroom hunt in the Alps since I was a little girl (4years old) and those are excellent! NOM!
Now as for the morels lobsters and honeys oysters... im still clueless although morels are hard to miss and pick poison ones. Cant wait for the spring since I did end up finding a "honey spot" for morels last year in dupage county!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
MissKay I am also from Europe! I have been having a hard time figuring out the mushrooms here in the states and was also clueless for a while. It seems prized mushrooms in Europe are disregarded here and vice versa. I know morels are considered un-edible where Im from. It is actually considered an insult to be called a "Morel" because it means your are insignificant. It is intersting to discover how different cultures value different mushrooms! I only found one morel south of Dupage county I cant find a decent patch of wooded land more than 10 feet across here in DuPage lol. Im glad your found some! I know what kind of trees to look for this year so I am hoping that increases my chances. Good Luck
 

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A great list / link I saved several years ago and I'm glad it still works. Wolf and Miss Kay, please see #7 on the list. Not trying to insult anyone, just hoping to help in the event you didn't know.

http://americanmushrooms.com/ten.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Morelsxs you are absolutly right with rule #7! I have heard of this rule multiple times! This also applies to North American hunters because West Coast and East coast mushrooms also differ!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yes Bud I know it was a foolish risk to take! I have been able to ID every mushroom except the one in the picture above! I wish I could do a spore print but couldnt find this bolete last year!!! Its driving me nuts! It resemblems a mushroom prized in europe but I cant get a translation!
 

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Wolf, Jack stated the name of that bolete in the comment just below the picture, subvelutipes grows abundantly here. It is considered edible by many, but there have been several recorded cases of poisoning from consuming it. There is another Bolete that is very similar, the bicolor bolete, which will grow right next to subvelutipes and it is very hard to tell them apart. There are lots of edible boletes in the Midwest, so why eat one that is probably poisonous?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
There are no known deadly boletes so the risk is lower. I know how the most poisonous ones look like and stay away from ones I cant ID. This was the only incident I gambled because it fit the profile of a mushroom I collected in Europe. Now I know that species differ from area to area. I do spore prints now to further confirm what type of mushroom I am consuming. Keep in mind this picture was taken years ago when I was just beggining my hobby. Many people are allergic to certain types of boletes and some cant be consumed with alcohol or in large portions.
 
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