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Bitter Bolete

Discussion in 'Ohio' started by sb, Jul 5, 2013.

  1. sb

    sb Morel Connoisseur

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    Hugh,
    Thanks for the help.re the Bitter Bolete. I had tried touching a fresh-cut cross section of the stem to my tongue and there was no bitterness. Next time I\'ll remember that it is the cap underside.

    What was interesting when I tasted the few pieces that I\'d sauteed was that it took 4 seconds for the bitterness to register. When I went through a similar learning experience 5 years ago, the bitterness was instantaneous and repulsive.

    I found reference by Chris M from a 2007 post where he\'d found two edible varieties of Tylopolis in GA. I\'m wondering if the stem in fact was edible on the ones I found yesterday. They would make wonderful medallions as sauteed cross sectional slices. I may go back and get another one and try it, out of curiosity. Still no Chanterelles for me, and I\'m hoping to harvest some Maitake this season also
     
  2. scott c

    scott c Morel Connoisseur

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    SB, I just saw this, Tylopilus Badiceps are everywhere right now fruiting next to your 3 or more bitter ones we have in Ohio. Look for white pore surface, usually a dent or crack in the stem, when cut no pink above the pore surface, very solid white flesh and a nibble will be quite sweet. There is a lighter colored variety T. ferrugineus that most references don't differentiate that is also sweet and delicious, some discoloration over time from vruising is common but no bluing.! I see them all over now mixed in with the bitters and alone, they are great eating! Check my posts on the main Ohio board.
     

  3. scott c

    scott c Morel Connoisseur

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    I forgot to menion Tylopilus alboater, no way of confusing it with the bitters SB, I have found these twice this year and Jason C down south of me has found dozens, the smokey or grey bolete. Not great on it's own but adds a smokey flavoring to whatever you cook it in. Dehyrates, when done properly, perfectly as well.