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I've been very successful at finding every type of morel in Indiana except for the black. I understand they are just not that prevalent in the Indy area, but I plan on following the season north this year and would love some input from some seasoned hunters that would help put some blackies in my bag this year. Even if I only get a few, I plan on collecting the spores and spreading them across Marion county so all hunters can enjoy the early birds around these parts!
Any info would be greatly appreciated, mainly trees as I concentrate most of my efforts on locating them first.
Let's work together to make all of Indiana a more productive state all around for nature's most wonderful gift, the morel mushroom!!!!
 

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I guess that's the kind of answer you were going to get Indy. Sad but I guess that's just the way it is. If you read any of my posts, you would know that I would help if I could. However, that being said, I really only hunt the yellows. Not because that's what I hunt but mostly because that's all I could find.

Good luck my friend. I'm sure you will eventually put a pattern together and be productive finding the blacks.

Mark

 

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I have never figured out the blacks. I have about 5 spots where I find them from year to year and each is completely different. One is in an old growth woods on the top of a very slight ridge. One is in a woods on a north slope with very moist black soil with scattered thickets. Two areas are north facing slopes near several dead trees of various varieties. I guess about the only "pattern" is that most of the spots I've stumbled upon are on north facing slopes. Otherwise the type of woods or trees in those woods seems to make no difference.
 

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In northern In. and southern Mi., the best places are usually slightly sloping hillsides with tulip poplar. When the blacks come up the ground cover is usually sparse, just old leaves and the occasional tulips from the trees. They are extremely hard to see unless they are big enough to stand above the leaves. Their color matches the leaves perfectly. One spot I got about 4 or 5lbs. from every year for 10 or mare years was by an old black cherry tree that was dying. Haven't found one there for 5 years now but I always look. It doesn't seam to matter what direction the hills are facing but that will effect how soon they pop. Hope this helps and good luck!
 

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I have a spot in my woods north of Muncie that gives me 100+ blacks every year. There is nothing specific or special about the location. Nothing but oaks, maples, and sycamores in my woods. They're very specific on their area. I could almost fence in their growing area and never find one outside of it.
 
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