Morel Mushrooms and Mushroom Hunting banner

21 - 40 of 144 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
Barnacle they look like hens to me.. Looks like the rain might have did them in. Remember that spot they will show up in years to come. Happy Hunting!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I put two treestands up today in spots where I always find hens. Nothing yet. It is still too early around Johnstown.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
300 Posts
IMG_6940.JPG
Barancle Could this be a young hen?

Not a Hen. I see a blueish color so I believe it to be Tyromyces caesius / Polyporus caesius. Might be able to use it as a dye for clothing like tee shirts.
If you rearrange Cassius it 1 letter off of my last name. Today's starting out great I parked my car to go for a quick hunt and as I was grabbing my gear I turned around and saw my first ever chickens! 5 feet from the car! Very tender and clean, I love first finds! I did see a chicken a few years ago but had no idea what is was and thought it was something to avoid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
I wasn't out hunting yet. A friend of mine stopped by the house today to show me some pictures of some hens he picked. Picked 12 around two different trees, what really surprised me was the size of some of them this early 4 of them where about 3ft around. Finished taking honey off hives and plugging shitake logs today....it's time to hunt!! Happy Hunting!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
Barnacle a tip for you when hunting hens. Look for black oaks (any red oak family tree) first and then white oaks. Hunt the edges of the forest first (field edge, roadside, power lines etc) zig zag 30-40 yards along that edge that's where most of the hens will be found if any are in that area. Once you get a feel for light exposure you got it nailed. Check every mature oak tree even if it's a single one in the middle of a field or a PARK (hint hint). Don't waste your time going on long hikes in the forest some could be found, but the most by far will be found on those edges!! Pick most of my hens on still standing mature stressed red oak family tree's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
300 Posts
Trahn, thanks for taking the time to type all that. I really appreciate such detailed advice. Your right I've been playing a numbers game checking every white oak in the forest! I will employ this new strategy and post what I come up with soon. Good luck out there. Thanks about the car also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I have never found a hen on a live tree, only on stumps. On top of the mountain, where I live, almost every tree is a large red oak. I've never found a hen there. I hunt among some giant old white oaks down the mountain and nothing, ever. Fortunately, the oaks I hunted deer under 35 years ago, are now stumps where I find hens now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
Yep stumps are good also.. But for me the still standing STRESSED tree's are the big producers. Sometimes it's hard to see the stress most times it's heart rot, but you'll see signs of stress in the canopy of the tree. The amount of light that makes it to the forest floor is a key also. If your in the middle of the forest and have an open canopy it's an edge. Trust me I've grew hens for years and light exposure is very important. Happy Hunting!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
300 Posts
image.jpg IMG_6960.JPG IMG_6961.JPG DING, DING, DING, DING found two babies. I'm getting sharper. Thanks Trahn, Domdart!

Oh 4 babies on same tree. I tend to focus on the side of the tree I can't see and am probably missing ones right in front of me.

Yep stumps are good also.. But for me the still standing STRESSED tree's are the big producers. Sometimes it's hard to see the stress most times it's heart rot, but you'll see signs of stress in the canopy of the tree. The amount of light that makes it to the forest floor is a key also. If your in the middle of the forest and have an open canopy it's an edge. Trust me I've grew hens for years and light exposure is very important. Happy Hunting!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
Discussion Starter #39
Was at a friends house yesterday... he has a very large log cultivation on his property and he's been picking lions mane. The weather has been right for them local for me. But.... I haven't been out hunting yet..LOL!!! Find most of my mane on really old dead oak trees and logs (Bark all slipped off). They say old beech trees are the target tree, but don't have much experience with that. Happy Hunting!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
Earth if you get back to that spot or see shang with berries pick them and plant them back where you picked. I like to space them about 2ft apart from each other, dig like a 1inch deep hole and place dirt back over. If left to just drop from mother it causes some crowding issues. Good stewardship is key for this rare plant.
 
21 - 40 of 144 Posts
Top