Morel Mushrooms and Mushroom Hunting banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Years ago I heard about the Ash tree connection but after much effort and time never a one morel under WHITE ash anyway, is it possible I was looking under the wrong species of ash tree? I believe some species of ash tree like very moist soil, is that the ash to look for? Also, the ash trees I spent a few years looking under were moderate to large in size, if that makes any difference.
I will say that although I 'wasted' much time in apple orchards, I finally did find regular morels on more than one occasion with apple trees, but not in an orchard, and not in the quantity a recent dead elm can produce.
(Might as well keep going, fyi) I once found easily over one hundred smallish morels under a very huge dead elm away from here in northern Vermont. And I thought the larger the tree the larger the morel, but that isn't always so.
I can say that I have never found a morel under a too-small-in-diameter dead elm tree, seems the trees need to be something other then finger thick.
Oh, I also once found a single ordinary morel under a lone very dead poplar trunk again in northern Vermont. Besides the flowering plant I mentioned earlier (very healthy bush with 5-pedal clumps of flowers near my home) that produces a dozen or so morels consistently year after year (except not that very dry recent Spring), that is pretty much all I can recommend to others hunting the elusive morel. Oh that and of course gardens, where I have never personally found one.
Hope that was helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
For your education (fye).... Though morels like (I have found) slopes, don't presume (as I once did and lost the whole batch to decay) that if an ideal side of a tree doesn't pan out that there will not be morels up above say on a flatish lawn where the moisture is captured by the plants, grass, there. They'll pop where the moisture is preferable despite the sun warming the ground more-so on a more vertical patch of land, iykwim.
ALso, I tried once cutting healthy elm trees practically right where morels already grew under dying elm, and NOTHING came of it. So I think THE WAY the tree is (so-called) killed has something to do with it - the elm disease and/or insects carrying it.
I once found one of those half-free verpas (is it called?) early in the season on a dry rocky area near Burlington, Vermont. Never have known anyone else to have found that species here.
We do get those early blocky false morels with white short squarish stems in wet areas and roadsides (been a while, hope memory serves me right). Look appetizing - I would appreciate hearing from anyone who has found these to be edible.
And of course the purple brain-like supposedly poisonous gyromitra (memory?) that I guess some people in other countries pre-boil and then eat.
That's it from here, for now.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top