Got 'em!

Discussion in 'New Hampshire' started by Leo Knight, May 6, 2019.

  1. Leo Knight

    Leo Knight Morel Enthusiast

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    Was just going about my business, visiting a blind shut-in who used to love foraging for and eating morels but now lost the use of her hands and feet, and also developed an alergic reaction to just morchella esculenta of all things, and there at the top of the driveway stood a large just dead Elm tree with would you believe it??? (This parts true, the part about the pitiful invalid is all made up! Sorry, my sense of humour takes some getting used to) several perfect young morels trailing after the surface growing root system of the tree.
    Halliluia praise God, pinch me someone.
     
  2. Charli

    Charli Young Morel

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    So have you found some in NH yet? I have been y the rain is great but not warm enough yet. Am I right???
     

  3. Charli

    Charli Young Morel

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    When I was very little I used to go morel hunting in Illinois in the hills around our farm. I remember filling potato sacks full of them. I really really want to find them. I just would like to spark up a little nostalgia. I would be happy to just even find a couple to eat !!
     
  4. Leo Knight

    Leo Knight Morel Enthusiast

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    CHARLI. Yeah, but not many, unfortunately.
    Finally at dusk in soaking woods I hit another good tree, could only see two though, no flashlight.
    Do you know what to look for with elms?
    I've already written some but here are more tips:
    In NH you may be best off driving around backroads that border water, streams, and watching for leafless tops on elms. The top of (dead) elm trees are whip like and slender branched so with some practice you should be able to distinguish them from other yet-to-leaf-out-trees such as ash and black locust. The bark of the latter is similar to elm but darker and coarser. In any case look for ANY signs of life on that elm tree, either a few remaining top leaves or trunk leaves (really) - then don't bother getting out of the car. The tree has got to be dying completely, probably with either some upper bark peeling off, or signs of a whitish patina or bloom on upper part of tree. But if there's much bark peeled off, and on the ground, don't expect much, dead too long - she's got to have most bark in place but no sign of life. Dead elms with many broken branches are also probably a waste of your time.
    Look for that whitish (i believe) fungal effect high up on trees - those are the best bets. They ARE out there NOW in NH, especially southern and warm spots. Just dam rare as hell. You gotta believe!
    And watch the poison ivy, damn I'm itchin'.
    I may be done for the season, got a busy few days ahead of me.
    Good luck.