Help fix mo fb 4-8-18

Discussion in 'Missouri' started by jamie, Apr 8, 2018.

  1. terrysapp

    terrysapp Morel Enthusiast

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    What do you mean when you say you don't pick any open cell or over 5 in? Thanks. Terry
     
  2. DirtyDog

    DirtyDog Morel Connoisseur

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    How about cactus?
     

  3. DirtyDog

    DirtyDog Morel Connoisseur

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    I'll just leave this right here......
     

    Attached Files:

  4. pirogue66

    pirogue66 Morel Enthusiast

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    Found about 50 in SEMO today....Scott CO...Blacks ,and small yellows.....way late season.
    Also found two timber rattlers !
     
  5. supplyguy1973

    supplyguy1973 Morel Connoisseur

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    I pick in cedars all the time
     
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  6. jamie

    jamie Morel Connoisseur

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    DIRTY DOG,SUPPLY GUY,KB- Let us not get confused now. I clearly stated that you can pick morels around cedars as the cedar trees are semi-solid and thus they drop the wind blown morel spores just like the fine wind blown snow gets dropped by the cedar trees in the winter. Cedars are a great place to pick morels simply for this reason. HOWEVER, CEDAR TREES CAN NOT PRODUCE MORELS-which was what the issue is and the bet is about) ONLY DEDISCOUS(spelling is not correct but it means trees with leaves) TREES CAN PRODUCE MORELS> CEDAR TREES AND ALL PINE TREES ARE NOT A DEDISCIOUS TREE. That is not my opinion but scientific fact. o_O
     
  7. jack

    jack Morel Connoisseur

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    I have to totally disagree with not finding Morels in Pines. I find Blacks & White Morels under White Pine and Red Pine all the time. 100_6885.jpg

    These are under White Pine, as you can tell by the needles & Pine Cones.
     
  8. jamie

    jamie Morel Connoisseur

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    Hey Jack-Always good to see the moderator chime in. I dont think that anyone doesn`t agree that you can find morels under cedar or pine trees almost anywhere. Thats pretty much a given. Please just dont say that you think the Pine trees produce the morels. That is what the issue here is, If cedar trees (or any pine tree) can produce morels? Notice how when everyone figured out maybe I better look this up and see if Ole Jamie knows what he is talking about or not. They read that just like Jamie said, "It is a scientific fact: Only dedicous(dont know correct spelling and neither does spell check) trees can produce morels and no other trees can and its nothing but crikets. Not one was man enough to acknowledge they were wrong. There is a word for them kind of folks but it escapes me at the moment. All one needs to remember is morel spores are windblown and can grow about anywhere-even under cedars or as you said, pines-they just dont come from them.

    Dirty dog was the best. Among others he(or she as registered here) said was, after offending 70k followers of a page he moderates (if you can imagine) over use of a soil temperature map were "We all know that sand warms up before black dirt" and "Please pray for all the farmers who havent got their fields disk(ed-was omitted) yet" Everybody was laughing so hard over them explaining how they use a digital thermometer,I dont think anybody cared to waste the time to tell em that black warms before white or tan or that its the moisture why you find morels around creeks and rivers before you find them in other areas or the fact that those un-discd field are already planted and 99% of farmers use no tile and dont work or disc the ground. Those who dont use no till do the discing in the fall after harvest

    Your opinion is always welcomed and thank you for allowing us to share this vital info. If time allows, please chime back in after you have researched the issue at hand...
     
  9. jamie

    jamie Morel Connoisseur

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    Just when you think it couldn`t get any better. I click on the 2018 thread to see what is reported and the last reply is from... you guessed it. Ole DD is still at it. And I quote,"morels don`t have roots." Now this is getting alittle ridiculous...
     
  10. greys

    greys Morel Enthusiast

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    Wow, I missed the pow wow! This is more exciting than the Iowa threads, Don't think he is a serious hunter... seems to be trolling. I would have to agree the morels only comes from Desidious trees. Sounds good to me jamie, if you ever find your self in central iowa during mushroom season, let me know.
     
  11. DirtyDog

    DirtyDog Morel Connoisseur

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    [​IMG]


    Morel Mushroom Monitoring in a Colorado Burn Area: June - September, 2003

    by Holly Miller


    Introduction

    Due to the number and intensity of wildfires that occurred in southwestern Colorado in 2002, specifically in the San Juan National Forest, morel mushrooms were expected to grow in record numbers in 2003. Forest managers anticipated a large influx of morel hunters in search of the prized mushroom. In order to monitor the morel mushroom harvest, permits were required for collection. A small-scale study was also conducted by Forest Service personnel on the abundance of morels and the success of mushroom hunters.

    Description of Study Area

    The San Juan National Forest is located in southwestern Colorado, and is divided into three ranger districts: Pagosa, Columbine, and Dolores. The largest of the 2002 wildfires within the forest occurred in the Columbine Ranger District--the Missionary Ridge Fire. This fire burned approximately 70,000 acres throughout several vegetation types, including mixed conifer, ponderosa pine, spruce-fir, and aspen. The fire varied in intensity throughout the burn area. For the purpose of this study, all vegetation types were searched, although an emphasis was put on mixed conifer and pure aspen stands.

    Methodology

    A selective search of nine areas within several vegetation types was conducted by Forest Service personnel on June 10 and 11, 2003. Several of these sites were revisited on June 26, 2003. Search areas were chosen by vegetation type and burn intensity. Most of the search areas were located east of Vallecito Reservoir, one was conducted west of Vallecito Reservoir, and one search was conducted west of Lemon Reservoir, along the Young’s Canyon Trail (Figure 1).


    Figure 1: Morel Mushroom Locations within the Missionary Ridge Burn Area

    Searches were conducted by hiking within the selected areas and seeking out areas of moderate to high intensity ground fires within ponderosa pine and aspen forests. Areas of concentration also included intense ground burns underneath downed ponderosa pine and aspen logs. Evidence of morel gathering was also looked for within these areas. Previous gathering is often indicated by “cuttings,” which are the remaining morel stems left after the cap has been removed, usually by a knife.

    Information on morel occurrence was also gathered from other forest service crews working in the area and familiar with the identification of the mushroom.
     
  12. DirtyDog

    DirtyDog Morel Connoisseur

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    Results

    East of Vallecito Reservoir

    Seven areas varying in size, vegetative component, and burn intensity were searched for morel mushrooms east of Vallecito Reservoir (Figure 1) on June 10, 2003. These areas are all accessible from FR 602 and FR 603. Morel mushrooms were found in two of the search areas.

    The largest patch of morels in this area was found in Gut Canyon, where they were growing in a mixed conifer stand that had experienced low to moderate burn intensity. The slope of the area was approximately 30 percent, while the aspect was east-northeast. Elevation was approximately 8,000 feet. The morels were found at the base of a burnt ponderosa pine stump and burnt aspen log, where the ground litter had been completely consumed in the immediate area (Figure 2). Twenty-four black morels were found in this area. The mushrooms ranged in size from one inch to five inches. All of the mushrooms were partially dried out, and were presumed to have emerged approximately one week before they were discovered. Moisture content of the soil seemed to be low, but the site was approximately 75 feet upslope of the creek, and the immediate microclimate was cool.

    [​IMG]
    Figure 2: Habitat where several black morels were found in the Gut Canyon area

    This area was revisited on June 26, 2003, and three black morels were found underneath the burnt aspen log. All were approximately one inch in size and were very dry.

    Another patch of morels was found east of Vallecito Reservoir, approximately 100 feet west of FR 603. The vegetation type was mixed conifer, on a 20 percent slope with a northwest aspect. Elevation was approximately 7,800 feet, and the intensity of the burn was moderate in this area. Five black morels were found growing underneath a fallen, burnt ponderosa pine log where a ground fire had occurred and the litter was removed (Figure 3). Morels in this area were approximately five inches in size. These morels were also somewhat dried out and had probably emerged a week prior to their discovery.

    [​IMG]
    Figure 3: Morels found growing underneath a burnt ponderosa pine log
     
  13. DirtyDog

    DirtyDog Morel Connoisseur

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    West of Vallecito Reservoir

    On June 10, 2003, the area east of Freeman Park, which is located at the end of FR 809 (Ho Hum Drive), was surveyed (Figure 1). The area was characterized by a ridge-top mixed conifer forest interspersed with pure aspen stands, and the burn intensity was high. Elevation was approximately 8,400 feet.

    Two black morels were found growing in close proximity underneath burnt aspen and ponderosa pine logs (Figure 4). The overstory in the immediate area consisted of aspen and ponderosa pine, with a few scattered white fir. The slope was 5 percent and the aspect was slightly east. The morels were approximately 2 inches tall and had emerged within the past few days, as they were relatively moist.

    [​IMG]
    Figure 4: This morel was found in a high intensity burn area

    This area was revisited on June 26, 2003, and morels were not found. However, the slopes immediately southwest of Freeman Park were searched, and 34 black morels were found (Figure 5). Burn intensity in the area was low to moderate. Slopes were 30 percent with a north aspect, and spruce, fir, and aspen dominated the canopy. The morels were located at the bottom of the slope and adjacent to a drainage, where the microclimate was cool and moist. Elevation was approximately 8,500 feet. Most morels were very dry, but a small percentage of morels that were found near the drainage bottom were moist and had emerged recently. This area was revisited on August 5, 2003, and only one dried morel was found.

    [​IMG]
    Figure 5:
    Over thirty morels were growing in this low intensity burn area

    West of Lemon Reservoir – Young’s Canyon Trail

    The area immediately adjacent to Young’s Canyon Trail was thoroughly searched for morel mushrooms on June 11, 2003. The trail winds through spruce-fir forest interspersed with pure aspen stands for approximately 3 miles. Aspects range from south to east while slopes vary from 20 to 30 percent. Moderate to high burn intensity is found in most areas. Elevations range from 8,200 feet to 10,000 feet.

    Morels were not found in this area. The location seemed favorable, and morels may emerge at a later date due to the higher elevation. The area also seemed dry and more rainfall is probably necessary for production.

    Wallace Lake Area

    In the first week of September 2003, approximately two pounds of morels were found by a Forest Service timber crewmember while working in the Wallace Lake Area (Figure 1). Morels were located on northeast and northwest facing slopes, within an area dominated by spruce-fir and aspen. Elevation was approximately 9,500 feet. Frequent rainfall and moderate temperatures at this high elevation probably contributed to the late season occurrence of these mushrooms.



    Discussion

    Morels were found in four of the nine search areas. Most of these areas were characterized by mixed conifer with aspen or spruce-fir-aspen vegetation types that had experienced low to moderate burn intensities. All of the morels within the mixed conifer were found near or underneath ponderosa pine or aspen logs that had fallen previous to the wildfire, and which then burned intensely enough to partially consume the logs and clear the ground of duff and litter. Morels in the spruce-fir-aspen were found in areas of low to moderate burn intensity underneath live white firs.

    All of the morels found were growing in the cooler microclimates within the forest. All of the mushrooms were found on northeast or northwest aspects, adjacent to drainages, and/or underneath logs. Morels that were underneath logs and in stump holes were the largest mushrooms that were found.

    Summary

    Sixty-six morels were found within four separate search areas within the Missionary Ridge Fire burn area. Additionally, two pounds of morels were found outside of these initial search areas, but within the Missionary Ridge Fire burn area. Habitat consisted of two different types: mixed conifer and spruce-fir-aspen. The lower elevation, mixed conifer stands had experienced low to moderate burn intensities, and was situated on northeast to northwest facing slopes. Morels were found within the cooler, moist microclimate within this habitat type. Morels in the spruce-fir-aspen stands were found in similar areas, but were found in higher densities in this habitat type--probably because the area received more rainfall and/or retained a higher moisture level.

    Morels were found at increasing elevations throughout the summer. In early June, several morels were found from 7,800 to 8,400 feet; however, many were dried and had been emerged for at least a week prior to discovery. In late June, a larger quantity of morels, ranging from dry to very fresh, were found at 8,500 feet. In September, two pounds of fresh morels were found at 9,500 feet. This trend is probably influenced by increasing temperatures and rainfall throughout the elevation range as the summer progresses (Figure 6).
     
  14. DirtyDog

    DirtyDog Morel Connoisseur

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    Jamie you are making a fool of yourself.
     
  15. jamie

    jamie Morel Connoisseur

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    ROTFLMAO:D Please dont put me in the same class as you dirty dog. Funny as hell how you try and post a bunch of pages from 03 to hide the real truth of what a true fool you are. When you pick 1/10 the morels I do then you can school me. Until then, get in the damn timber and stfu. Nobody wants to hear your baseless, idiotic opinions that are not true. Waste some elses time.
    Greys. Glad to see you agree on the cedars. I am hunting across river from Iowa now and I will be in Sioux City tonite. Go to Winnavegas after dark and look for the guy passed out at the end of the buffet. I run with the skins from Winnebago. Now them boys can do some huntin. You are welcome to hunt with me anytime. Bring dirty with ya....;)
     
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  16. jamie

    jamie Morel Connoisseur

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    OMG Dirty just wont accept scientific fact that cedars and pines CAN NOT produce morels. Yes morels are picked in burns and around and under cedars and pine trees. SO? SO WHAT? The morels spores may have landed and grew there. Again, SO what? That does not mean the morels came from them. Dude, based solely on your posts, I must admit. you have got to be hands down just about the dumbest individual I have ever not met. Should we be surprised... How about go moderate a fishing site- they tell alot of tall tales.


    Dam that rain feels good. Can you hear the morels? Dying to see what the reply to this one is. "Rain is not wet" I'm betting...
     
  17. DirtyDog

    DirtyDog Morel Connoisseur

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    Thank you Jamie. You are right, I am a hapless fool otherwise I would not have engaged you regarding morel mushroom. You are obviously the smartest person here with an obvious wealth of knowledge about morels.
    Good day,
    Sam
     
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  18. Yukon Cornelius

    Yukon Cornelius Morel Enthusiast

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    Trolling and trash talking on a site dedicated to mushroom hunting? Now I've seen it all. Social discourse truly has devolved into the 7th circle of hell.

    Oh, and it's "deciduous."
     
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  19. jack

    jack Morel Connoisseur

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    I don't accept it either. I'm thinking your references are out dated, just like 98% of the Mushroom Identification Books. Every mushroom has a host, I find hundreds of morels in the middle of a 20 square mile area of nothing but pine. I'm in Michigan and the Ash trees are gone, just like most of the Elm trees. Now they are turning up under Maple and mixed Maple, Oak and Beech as well.
    One of my best books is Ascomycete Fungi of North America by Michael.W Beug, Alan E. Bessette and Arleen R. Bessette, copyright and published in 2014. This book lists over 30 species of Morchella, with sub-species showing up all the time. Things are changing all the time especially with the DNA Sequencing, and a large contributor being Alan Rockefeller, out on the West Coast.
     
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  20. DirtyDog

    DirtyDog Morel Connoisseur

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    Exactly Jack good information thank you