Hunting in Maine

Discussion in 'Maine' started by Mr. Mush333, Apr 29, 2019.

  1. 1 lb

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  1. Mr. Mush333

    Mr. Mush333 Morel Enthusiast

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    I started searching for Morels in Maine this year. I've been scoping out my hopeful spots and keeping an eye on the local apple orchards (I know not to eat any I find in the commercial orchards but if I find some there I hope to make slurries out of them to try to inoculate my own apple trees.) Any helpful suggestions or updates on Morels you find in the Maine Sagadahoc, York, & Cumberland counties would be appreciated. "You don't need to give up where you found them just that you did :D Lets work together to establish just how prolific morels can be in Maine!!!
     
    Leo Knight likes this.
  2. Leo Knight

    Leo Knight Morel Connoisseur

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    For now, if I were in Maine I'd check near the coast where I believe it warms up first.
    And don't bother with too-dead elms, geezum how many hours I wasted in those first years thinking and hoping those snags had 'shrooms under them!
    Best of luck!
    (I'm sure I'm not telling you anything you don't already know. I'm new)
     

  3. Mr. Mush333

    Mr. Mush333 Morel Enthusiast

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    Actually your Dead Elm advice is great. I havn't actually found any Elms myself. I've been searching Birch, Beach, and Ash trees in mixed woods, and I also found a sizable ravine area containing skunk cabbage. I also hear old quarries are good spots to check so I've been casing a few of those in my area as well. Have you found any sizable stands of morels in Maine since you started searching?
     
  4. Leo Knight

    Leo Knight Morel Connoisseur

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    All my morel hunting experience, well 99%, has been from western MA to northern VT.
    Dead Elms: shxt, I could talk on this subject for days -
    I look at the top of the trees, confirming first that no live buds are present, that it's truly dead as a door nail, then for the sign of the separation of upper bark (like 2/3 the way up if memory serves me right) from the wood or trunk of the tree, usually they'll be reddish coloration from the inner bark showing, the cabian or cambrian layer of the tree. Unless your car(!) is tooo far away then of course you may not make out the color. Sometimes the tree will be a "perfect" spot or candidate for morels but darn it they'll never come up there! no matter how many times and years you check! Usually that's when the soil is either too clayie and hard packed or just too wet all around the tree 'coz this elm decided to live in essentially a swamp, which the seeds are inclined to favor.
    HOWEVER, after steering clear of elms in swampy areas, I thereafter once came upon some too-far-gone large morels growing under dead elms in a patch of FERNS of all things, the type that love swampy areas - don't ask me why but suffice it to say (in my experience) that is a rare sight, morels growing side-by-side with those light-green broadish leaved ferns (in this case not the ones that are called fiddlehead ferns and often eaten).
    So just trying to save people time, especially we hardup desperate individuals that don't live where they grow semi-abundantly right in the heart of the woods. Now that's a great experience finding morels somewhat into the woods instead of on the edges. Seems that the elms that take, these days, only take on the edges and therefore you almost never find one growing and/or dying deep in the woods, or even SHALLOW in the woods, not round here. I reckon the combination of moisture and sunshine (to germinate) is rarely present, and that woods-elms have long since died away during those glory years of the morel in the past century.
    I've never found a morel under an even SLIGHTLY still alive elm tree - for what it's worth. But miss the year they fruit and you'll find MAYBE a couple the followig year (in these parts, in my experience, that is). I can honestly say after years of diligently checking spots that I've never seen morels pop three years in a row under what has to be the associate tree, though adjacent dying trees can keep things going in a spot for quite some time, sibling trees following their brothers and sisters to tree-heaven!
    Sorry so long.
    Oh, and i heard about quarries too and chased them down, especially limestone areas, naw, probably just a coincidence that an elm or whatever lived and/or died nearby. As things change what was applicable to the past often barely pertains to the now.
     
  5. Mr. Mush333

    Mr. Mush333 Morel Enthusiast

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    Searched all day Saturday but didn't find anything except for some orange and some grey/brown jelly mushrooms growing on trees. I'm hoping to find something this coming weekend. I'm going to check some local orchards.
     
  6. Mr. Mush333

    Mr. Mush333 Morel Enthusiast

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