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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Found these down a ditch near the side of the road, next to what I think is an elm tree. I am a beginner mushroom hunter and need help identifying these. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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dead elm tree?
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Sorry I'm no expert but those are beautiful pictures! Maybe in the future include a coin for sizing. Are there black spores? I was just reading this "Its growth on wood readily distinguishes it from the many inky caps grow on manure, straw, and similar nitrogen-rich habitats. Its medium size and clustered growth also eliminate many small (less than 3cm across when mature) or solitary species.
Mica caps must be cooked and eaten almost immediately after collecting as they will begin to deliquesce or dissolve into an inky black spore filled liquid within 1 to 3 hours."

Source: Coprinellus micaceus: The Ultimate Mushroom Guide
 

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Why in God's name would you want to know? Are you that desperate to eat mushrooms? Then go to the market and grab some buttons and portabellos! Why mess with the unknown?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@MorchellaMaximus Thank you, and thanks for the tips! I found these on my first mushroom hunt yesterday, so I am a super beginner. I did not take a spore print, but I can go back and get one as they are very near to where I live.
 

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@shroomsearcher Don't worry I am not going to eat these, as I am not positive what they are. I would like to learn more about mushrooms so I can forage more in the future. Though I did eat some Dryad's saddle that I found yesterday, because it was very easy to ID. Unfortunately, no morels were to be found. Thanks for the concern, though. I will be careful :)
 

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@shroomsearcher Don't worry I am not going to eat these, as I am not positive what they are. I would like to learn more about mushrooms so I can forage more in the future. Though I did eat some Dryad's saddle that I found yesterday, because it was very easy to ID. Unfortunately, no morels were to be found. Thanks for the concern, though. I will be careful :)
I suppose I made an assumption there based on my own biases. I just ignore flushes of LBM's (Little Brown Mushroom) out of hand, because there are literally thousands of species, and it is very hard to make a positive ID.

Compare to mica caps, which are indeed edible. Just not the best tasting.
Well said. Just because something is edible doesn't mean that it is good to eat. And it's not just mushrooms. The last time I and my siblings got together at a restaurant for a meal, I ordered the ribeye steak, same as my BIL. He said his steak was delicious and tender. Half of my steak was far, and the half that wasn't far was tough! I actually loosened a few teeth trying to chew that hockey puck of a steak! We will never go back there again!
 

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@shroomsearcher Yeah thanks for the advice really, because I am very new to mushrooms and it will never hurt to be extra cautious. I have been thinking about how easy it would be to have my ego kill me...underestimating nature's power and the fragility of the human body and overestimating my knowledge.

Well said. Just because something is edible doesn't mean that it is good to eat. And it's not just mushrooms. The last time I and my siblings got together at a restaurant for a meal, I ordered the ribeye steak, same as my BIL. He said his steak was delicious and tender. Half of my steak was far, and the half that wasn't far was tough! I actually loosened a few teeth trying to chew that hockey puck of a steak! We will never go back there again!
Funny story :) Maybe that's why mushroom hunting is so appealing to me..because I really don't like going out to restaurants. I love the idea of foraging, but I see what you're saying in that it is not worth the risk for something not that tasty. I guess this is why people say to be 100% sure before eating anything.
 

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I just ignore flushes of LBM's (Little Brown Mushroom) out of hand, because there are literally thousands of species, and it is very hard to make a positive ID.

Me too. Too many things can go wrong. My grandmother could pic them. And some of them are delicious, grew up eating them. Wish I had paid more attention when she took me in the woods.
 

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Why in God's name would you want to know? Are you that desperate to eat mushrooms? Then go to the market and grab some buttons and portabellos! Why mess with the unknown?
Please don’t be a prick It’s not about being desperate you are a jerk for what you said going out hiking looking for mushrooms being active walking in the woods circulate in your blood trying to learn something asking for help asking for advice and then somebody like you comes along maybe you should do the world a favor bend over and shove your head up well you know where
 

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Found these down a ditch near the side of the road, next to what I think is an elm tree. I am a beginner mushroom hunter and need help identifying these. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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dead elm tree? View attachment 38816
Hey Corvus, it looks like you’ve positively identified a dead elm tree. Which is a great start for a newbie. The bad news is that your tree has been taken over by a different type of fungus. In my experience, once I find that gang of little whatever mushrooms those are, I never find morels under that tree. Not saying it’s not possible, just saying that’s been MY experience. Anyway welcome to the wonderful world of morel hunting. Good luck, you should be able to find some now that you know what trees to look for. Apple trees are a great source too.
 

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Inky caps. I have eaten them but not so great. Very wet when you try to cook them. Do not consume alcohol when you eat them - they contain a chemical that will have you vomiting. Same chemical they can give to alcoholics. Of course don’t eat anything unless you have an expert verify them in person.
 

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Inky caps. I have eaten them but not so great. Very wet when you try to cook them. Do not consume alcohol when you eat them - they contain a chemical that will have you vomiting. Same chemical they can give to alcoholics. Of course don’t eat anything unless you have an expert verify them in person.
Is the inky cap similar to the shaggy main?
 

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The mushrooms are not inky caps. The one commonly called inky cap as Coprinus comatus. Those pictured are Coprinellus micaceus. The genus used to be called Coprinus.The tree is not a Dead Elm. One species of Coprinellus can cause ill effects if eaten in conjunction with alcohol. For small thin fleshed fungi even if it's considered safe to eat, there is little left except mush if you try to cook them. There are many species of "little brown mushrooms". Nearly all 'LBM's in ID books say "edibility unknown" however some can be quite toxic.
It's good to see newbies ask questions. To learn mushroom ID I suggest joining a mushroom club. They can be found on namyco.org, the site of the North American Mycological Society. Use caution whenever collecting mushrooms near roads. The fungi can absorb any chemicals from car exhaust or weed killers etc.
 
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