Late November, 2015 Morel

Discussion in 'Iowa' started by shroom god, Dec 2, 2015.

  1. jack

    jack Administrator Staff Member

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    In case you're wondering, those are Stinkhorns, most likely Phallus impudicus or P. hadriani.
     

  2. shroom god

    shroom god Morel Connoisseur

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    Thanks for the expert input on that, Jack. I definitely need to do some research on stinkhorns. Frankly, I can vaguely recollect only ever hearing of them, perhaps once or twice on this site.

    I was flummoxed. When she described it with a long stem and rather small cap, my thoughts went to verpa (equally odd though; definitely out of season). I asked if the cap had pits or vertical "gills", and she assured me it was pitted--like a morel. She sent me the pic which clearly affirmed that the cap was pitted, indicating something from the morchella genus. But the distinct "phallus" shape really had me thinking "Hmmmm...well, maybe this is merely a freakish characteristic of the peculiar consequence of this morel." In turn, that led me to infer that perhaps this aberration was another indicator of climate change!

    So among the phallus shrooms I see pictured on the web, this looks most like the phallus hadriani--as you suggest. I wonder how common these are to Iowa. Any sense of that?

    She'll be delighted to know what she found. Thanks for the input and for an extraordinary site. I enjoy the dialogue it fosters and it consistently proves to be a very accurate source of information and advice throughout the morels season.

    <strong>150 days to go--a few more or less--until Iowa starts poppin! </strong>

    Happy holidays to all, and may the countdown go swiftly!