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With these forecasted below average temps this week. I think there is still a chance for a few nice stragglers here and there. Saturday the 5th is forecasted for 90, then they’re toast.
 

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Aspen are in the same family as cottonwood, which are fantastic morel producers. Most of the commercially picked morels that come from Kansas and Nebraska come off the river cottonwoods.
It makes sense that commercial pickers focus on cottonwood. You can pretty much train a monkey to walk in a line through a river bottom. No skill or knowledge required.
 

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To be a hard core morel hunter I think you have to be able to follow Winston Churchhill's definition of success. " The ability to move from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." I certainly failed more than I succeeded this year, even after 50 some years of hunting. This is probably what new pickers need to understand about morel hunting. Make it about the hunt, because if results are all that matters you will not be hunting long. Particularly if you plan on chasing south to north to follow the season.
Well said, by both Sir Winston and yourself. I failed my whole first year! After discussions with some members of my fish and game club who gave me some additional tips, and went out the next year and had some success. Not a lot, but it kept me going!

I have never seen oysters look like that 🧐
There's a post on Ohio Game Fishing's wild edibles page with pics showing a major flush of yellow oysters. A quick google search showed that they are a prized edible in many parts of the world! I've never found them around here either, in fact oysters seem to be a rarity overall around here.
 

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I have never seen oysters look like that 🧐
So I remember reading an article that the DNR suspected that within the last decade, someone was growing them at home and they either transplanted them or spores took hold outside. This was down by Wabasha/Winona area where they first found them I believe. Anyway, they’ve been slowly popping up more and more in the southern half of the state. I keep hoping I’ll find them...
 

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Hmmmm, global warming?? I know where to find both oysters, and elm oysters, and i have ideas about staging some popular to propagate them but this new one is unknown to me and interesting.
 

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So I remember reading an article that the DNR suspected that within the last decade, someone was growing them at home and they either transplanted them or spores took hold outside. This was down by Wabasha/Winona area where they first found them I believe. Anyway, they’ve been slowly popping up more and more in the southern half of the state. I keep hoping I’ll find them...
Hey @tundraking ! You'll certainly find some soon enough! They've spread across the middle of the country like wildfire for the past 5 yrs or so. Becoming more and more prominant each season. In Iowa they've been everywhere & on a variety of host trees for years. Word around here.. or Mush Talk(Grapevine) An Iowa State Professor and his students inoculated trees/logs/stumps with the spores. I read an article about this venture @IA State University somewhere aroun 2015ish too. Been a great success so far in my humble opinion. Other states Regional mush groups also say home mushroom cultivars are to blame for wild spore release..aswell as National & International Identification & Foraging groups. Delicious and being able to spot em from afar make them enjoyable edibles for my Family!
 

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Hmmmm, global warming?? I know where to find both oysters, and elm oysters, and i have ideas about staging some popular to propagate them but this new one is unknown to me and interesting.
Hey @Mason ! Definitely agree with you! VERY, very interesting species and interesting to research! I believe the"Golden Oyster" is native to Japan. At one time only found in the land of the Rising Sun🇯🇵 but eventually spreading to Russia and China. Hope you pick some here soon and like em! I hear more and more people say "Goldens" are becoming or already have become their favorite edible(even over morchella, gawd forbid!!!!:unsure:!! I would definitely label them as "Choice" as far as edibility! SchroomOn, 🍄!
 

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Hey @tundraking ! You'll certainly find some soon enough! They've spread across the middle of the country like wildfire for the past 5 yrs or so. Becoming more and more prominant each season. In Iowa they've been everywhere & on a variety of host trees for years. Word around here.. or Mush Talk(Grapevine) An Iowa State Professor and his students inoculated trees/logs/stumps with the spores. I read an article about this venture @IA State University somewhere aroun 2015ish too. Been a great success so far in my humble opinion. Other states Regional mush groups also say home mushroom cultivars are to blame for wild spore release..aswell as National & International Identification & Foraging groups. Delicious and being able to spot em from afar make them enjoyable edibles for my Family!
Thats great to hear!
 
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