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Found hens last year at about thesame time that the Chants started flushing in a particular woods.. Hasn't been the same this year. I've been finding some Chants, but not as many as last year. Then I realized that I found my very first chicken in October! So, have some patience.
 

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Looking back on last year’s pics, I found a nice hen on August 28. …then the final one was mid Oct. so, a wide window there. I haven’t been looking hard for them, but I have wandered past some of the trees I’ve collected from and haven’t seen any signs yet. I’m hoping that they aren’t as affected by the drought as the chants.
 

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Should start to see some hens here with all this rain as long as the temps stay a little cooler. Will be going and checking my spot this week and will let you know whats happening.
 

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Looking back on last year’s pics, I found a nice hen on August 28. …then the final one was mid Oct. so, a wide window there. I haven’t been looking hard for them, but I have wandered past some of the trees I’ve collected from and haven’t seen any signs yet. I’m hoping that they aren’t as affected by the drought as the chants.
I wondered about that, and thought it wouldn't make a difference since they are growing as a parasite on a living tree. However, my best hen finding years, have been the wetter years. Maybe when the tree is starved for water, the hen will not be able to get enough nutrition from the tree in order to flush! I have no science to back this up, but it seems logical to me.
 

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I know I wish I had my phone but I don't carry it on me at work. I spray fertilizer in yards, it was in the way back of a big yard. It was already starting to rot. I only imagine it was so dry here this spring and summer that the recent rains made it sprout. About 15 miles east of Rochester
 

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Believe what you want, I don't care. I just thought it was cool to find one this time of year. Here is a stinkhorn I found last week. All the stinkhorns I have found are all in wood chips.
40536
 

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It was no stinkhorn, it was a 6" morel nearly 3" wide. I only wanted to point out how crazy it was seeing it in September. Maybe I will go check some of my spots that never flushed this year because they were too dry. I have seen those stinkhorns too, but only up in the grand rapids area. Anyways the hens are also out here, I have found a couple nice ones and now the puffballs are getting large and the honey mushrooms are prime. Find old birch stumps and roots here and there are hundreds of honey mushrooms. I boil them then fry them to get rid of the slime. They are worth the effort! Good luck to all!
 

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Discussion Starter · #137 ·
It was no stinkhorn, it was a 6" morel nearly 3" wide. I only wanted to point out how crazy it was seeing it in September. Maybe I will go check some of my spots that never flushed this year because they were too dry. I have seen those stinkhorns too, but only up in the grand rapids area. Anyways the hens are also out here, I have found a couple nice ones and now the puffballs are getting large and the honey mushrooms are prime. Find old birch stumps and roots here and there are hundreds of honey mushrooms. I boil them then fry them to get rid of the slime. They are worth the effort! Good luck to all!
Ya, not worth fighting that claim here. Its just simply not possible. Morel mycelium goes dormant after the soil temps reach 60 degrees. It doesn't matter how wet or dry the soil is. At that point, they go dormant until the seasons have cycled. You would be the first human in recorded history to find a morel well after they are dormant. I'm with JG on this one. I've seen big stinkhorns in SE MN and north of the metro in the summer, and at first glance they can absolutely look like a morel.
Anyway, on another note, if you have a no fail way to make honey mushrooms not slimy, please post what you do! I gave it a good effort a couple years ago, cooked them, rinsed them, and froze them in portions. They are still slimy... and I still have some in the freezer... The only thing I will use them for is stew, cause the flavor is great, and they help thicken the broth, but they are still slimy/slippery. I'm not squeamish by any means, but when I put one of those in my mouth, its like I'm chewing on a slug! At least I assume thats what it would be like... :sick:
So if you have a recipe or a solid way to process them, please share!
 

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Ya, not worth fighting that claim here. Its just simply not possible. Morel mycelium goes dormant after the soil temps reach 60 degrees. It doesn't matter how wet or dry the soil is. At that point, they go dormant until the seasons have cycled. You would be the first human in recorded history to find a morel well after they are dormant. I'm with JG on this one. I've seen big stinkhorns in SE MN and north of the metro in the summer, and at first glance they can absolutely look like a morel.
Anyway, on another note, if you have a no fail way to make honey mushrooms not slimy, please post what you do! I gave it a good effort a couple years ago, cooked them, rinsed them, and froze them in portions. They are still slimy... and I still have some in the freezer... The only thing I will use them for is stew, cause the flavor is great, and they help thicken the broth, but they are still slimy/slippery. I'm not squeamish by any means, but when I put one of those in my mouth, its like I'm chewing on a slug! At least I assume thats what it would be like... :sick:
So if you have a recipe or a solid way to process them, please share!
I have been seeing them everywhere (Indy) and think about trying them but each time I read about them the word slimy is always included in the story.
 
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