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I have never messed with honey mushrooms. A lot of the boletes i collect are also on the slimy side for frying, so i dehydrate them. Is this an option for honey's?
 

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I understand the skepticism, but mushrooms pop when and where they will! The first time I found Meadow Mushrooms, "pinkies", Agaricus campestris, was in late September through October right up until first frost. Everything I read about them them indicated that they were a late season mushroom. Then one year, I found them growing in August! They are iin a city park, and you can see them from the street! It was an extraordinarily wet year. I guessed that all that water caused the flush. Despite being the wettest August on record here, no flush. It was droughtlike before that.
 

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Can anyone help with an Agaricus ID? I’ve ruled out A. xanthoderma because while the stem stains yellow, it persists (instead of fading away), and the whole thing smells strongly of almonds. I’m thinking A. augustus (“The Prince”), which would be amazing since I have a ton of them. Could be A. subrufescens or something else too though. I’m pretty sure brown gills + almond smell = edible no matter what, but I want to be sure. Any ideas? They’re growing in a cluster (from a central “bulb”) in leaf mulch.
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Can anyone help with an Agaricus ID? I’ve ruled out A. xanthoderma because while the stem stains yellow, it persists (instead of fading away), and the whole thing smells strongly of almonds. I’m thinking A. augustus (“The Prince”), which would be amazing since I have a ton of them. Could be A. subrufescens or something else too though. I’m pretty sure brown gills + almond smell = edible no matter what, but I want to be sure. Any ideas? They’re growing in a cluster (from a central “bulb”) in leaf mulch. View attachment 40571 View attachment 40572
Try checking out Reddening Lepiota.
 

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Try checking out Reddening Lepiota.
Thanks. This one doesn't stain red at all, just chrome yellow, and only on the surface of the stem. The stem on this one is also white, not brown, and the cap isn't nearly as dark as the Reddening Lepiota.
 

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Morel mycelium does not go dormant. It is a live living being and only fruits when it feels the need to propagate. If it is not threatened it will not fruit. A good year for the mycelium is a poor year for morel fruiting bodies.
I've heard numerous reports of all morels for nay areas of the country but not enough to go out searching, even by those who found them. I was a moderator of a morel discussion board for several years, if any remember Michael Kuo's board. He now runs mushroomexpert.com. I got lots of new info from posters tips which helped be find morels in Virgina in places I'd never considerd before, one being under Cedar trees. In some foreign countries fall is the preferred time to hunt morels. Im never surprised when it come to morels and when and where they can be found.
 

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Fall seriously is there any scientific proof or just here say from people on the internet.
I think members of the morchella genus that are almost strictly saprophytes are more likely to have less predictable fruiting. I've heard of and seen evidence of serotinal/autumnal fruiting of morchella rufobrunnea from the American southwest, so I wouldn't be too surprised to hear of fruiting of saprobic morels elsewhere!
 

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I don't beleive everything I read on the net. There was much less negativity years ago then there is now. I won't even consider most social media but do post occasionally on boards such as this. I held a lot of confidence in some of the peole who used tobereglars on the morel discussion board. Quite a few sent me sloil samples fro up and down the east coast westward all the way to idaho which I had tested by my local extension service to see if there was any nutrient in common where morels fruited. No ther wasn't bt nearly all were from acidic soil which contradicted the then feelings that morels preferred "sweet" soil. I put a lot of faith in what this type of person told me. Some I knew or met thru being a NAMA member and attending regional and national mushroom forays with upward of 300 people at some national forays. I helped a french person with his study on morels aslo. Where I now live in SC we usually get Lactifluus Indigo ( formerly Lactarius) in the late summer but this year it fruited in the early spring. when and where morels or other mushrooms are usually about the same time each year but occasional fruitngs at other times or in strange places never surprise me too awfully much.
 

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Well I went out yesterday, although I didn't see any more morels lol, I have never seen so many different species in 1 day. There was literally hundreds of different mushrooms out there. Some new ones for me are these. I am pretty sure this is indigo milk cap, there was quite a few of these. And I never really researched boletes but the fatter one there was about 20 and the yellowish one hundreds. The puffballs were past prime now, nearly 2 ft wide and 1 tall. I heard the milk caps are good but I didn't know when I saw it so maybe I will go back.
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Plant Mushroom Terrestrial plant Natural landscape Grass
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Mushroom Terrestrial plant Fawn Agaricaceae Plant
 

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Morel mycelium does not go dormant. It is a live living being and only fruits when it feels the need to propagate. If it is not threatened it will not fruit. A good year for the mycelium is a poor year for morel fruiting bodies.
I've heard numerous reports of all morels for nay areas of the country but not enough to go out searching, even by those who found them. I was a moderator of a morel discussion board for several years, if any remember Michael Kuo's board. He now runs mushroomexpert.com. I got lots of new info from posters tips which helped be find morels in Virgina in places I'd never considerd before, one being under Cedar trees. In some foreign countries fall is the preferred time to hunt morels. Im never surprised when it come to morels and when and where they can be found.
Absolutely. A lot of morel hunting's popularity is attributed to the onset of the Dutch Elm Disease many years ago. It is well knowm that morels enjoyed mycorhizzal relationships with plants, expecially elms. When the mycelium sensed that the trees were in trouble, they knew it was time to get out of Dodge! We have to have at least 1,000 dead elm snags at my hunting club, and I've only found morels under one of them, and that was only one time. That Fall and Winter the rest of the bark fell off, and the snag began to fall apart. I engaged in some serious self abuse early on, buyshwahcking my way through awful thickets to check out the dead elm snags. It seems to me that they've been dead too long, and the morel-elm connection has pretty much played out around here.

However, discussing the prior morel season with one of the member who clued me in to the fact that they grew there, he asked me if I had checked the apple trees. We have a lot of apple trees scattered randomly all over the club. I had no idea about the apple-morel connection, and said no. He said, "AW man! You gotta check the apple trees! "

Heading out this year, I was head to a certain area where I have found them before. The club calls it "The Dog Training Area", and there are paths cut all through it. Walking in on the main trail, I noticed that the club had cut a couple of new trails off of it. Not having much success in my initial search, I decided to have a look at those new trails. I remembered reading in Michael Kuo's book "Morels", that the building of roads, trails, any kind of land grading or activity that disturbs a morel mycelium, if present, might cause it to flush. Guess where I found a whole bunch of morels?


I don't beleive everything I read on the net. There was much less negativity years ago then there is now. I won't even consider most social media but do post occasionally on boards such as this. I held a lot of confidence in some of the peole who used tobereglars on the morel discussion board. Quite a few sent me sloil samples fro up and down the east coast westward all the way to idaho which I had tested by my local extension service to see if there was any nutrient in common where morels fruited. No ther wasn't bt nearly all were from acidic soil which contradicted the then feelings that morels preferred "sweet" soil. I put a lot of faith in what this type of person told me. Some I knew or met thru being a NAMA member and attending regional and national mushroom forays with upward of 300 people at some national forays. I helped a french person with his study on morels aslo. Where I now live in SC we usually get Lactifluus Indigo ( formerly Lactarius) in the late summer but this year it fruited in the early spring. when and where morels or other mushrooms are usually about the same time each year but occasional fruitngs at other times or in strange places never surprise me too awfully much.
I would have doubted the "sweet soil" idea as well. You don't find a whole lot of sweet soils in the wild. This has even become a bone of contention at my hunting club, which, way back in the day, had limestone quarries. We have a lot of limestone up here. At one meeting the board claimed that we didn't have to lime our crop fields, which we plant for the wildlife, since there was so much limestone around. Stupidest thing I may have ever heard. I got the floor and asked in which direction rain falls! Yes, it falls down from the sky, and trickles down through the soil. I then asked them to explain to me the mechanism by which the calcium from underlying limestone could be transported upward to the roots of the seedlings that we had planted! They, of course, had no answers!
 

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Those clusters are from insect damage. They work upward from the base thru the flesh of Chanterelles. Those clusters are similar to how worms leave casting on the surface of the soil.. The flesh of infested chanties is very not to my appetite.
 

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Those clusters are from insect damage. They work upward from the base thru the flesh of Chanterelles. Those clusters are similar to how worms leave casting on the surface of the soil.. The flesh of infested chanties is very not to my appetite.
Thanks Tim! Too bad I didn't grab the ones that looked normal. I've found chanterelles a few times but I've never seen anything like this and it made me question what I thought I knew. We got some chicken and hen anyway :)
 

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:ROFLMAO: Hmmmm. Could be a hybrid!

When I spotted my first chicken, it was on a golf course. We were driving from the second green to the third tee, with a grove of oaks to the right. I looked in there and saw those colors, and told my buddy to stop the cart. He asked why and I told him that I saw a hen of the woods. He looked and expected to see your pic! I took him over there and showed him up close. I put my fingers on it, Laetiporus cincinnatus, and it was prime!
 
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