Morel Mushrooms and Mushroom Hunting banner
21 - 37 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
I am no expert on trumpets, but I'd like to be... I found "3" once... lol Mixed forest. From what I understand, they like not only well drained slopes, but the drainage spots where two slopes come together. I gave my daughter one and she hasn't stopped talking about them for 2 years. She doesn't even like mushrooms... So this year is the year, as I plan to go back to the area I found them and concentrate on that area. The problem is, there are so many other good shrooms there that you get distracted easily... Good Luck and report back if you have success.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Im no expert by any means, but I have four spots I find black trumpets every year. They are all large mossy areas around bigger white oaks (not dead). Its mature forest, so not a lot of undergrowth and a fair amount of sunlight. These four areas are all in the same general area, so I hesitate to make a definitive statement about how to target them. Finding more spots is one of my mushroom goals this year, got to keep expanding :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
I agree with all of that! The one time I found them, it was big older white oaks, moss, drainage, and some sunlight, but not much. They are older oaks after all, so it was definitely more shaded than sunny. I looked back through my photos and it was early/mid August when I found them. Well, hopefully this helps us all this year!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,160 Posts
Do you normally find them on higher ground or lower? I don't have a whole lot of white oak in my area, mostly red and pin. There is a place with red oaks growing along a creek, and I find hen of the woods growing on them. There is an absolutely ginormous white oak, growing a little further distance from the creek. But, no moss! I always look, but I never find anything around it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
There doesn't seem to be rock hard info on this. This is what wikipedia says:

Entoloma abortivum, commonly known as the aborted entoloma[2] or shrimp of the woods, is an edible mushroom in the Entolomataceae family of fungi. Caution should be used in identifying the species before eating[3] (similar species such as Entoloma sinuatum being poisonous).[4] First named Clitopilus abortivus by Miles Joseph Berkeley and Moses Ashley Curtis, it was given its current name by the Dutch mycologist Marinus Anton Donk in 1949.[5]
It was believed that the honey mushroom, Armillaria mellea, was parasitizing the entoloma. But research[6] has indicated that the inverse may be true—the entoloma may be parasitizing the honey mushroom. There is still some disagreement by mushroom collectors about this since it is common to see both the aborted and unaborted forms of the entoloma on wood and in leaf litter, whereas Armillaria generally only fruits on wood. Both versions of the entoloma have also been observed when there are no Armillaria fruiting.
The way I read that article, which matches with my understanding, is that you may find both the “aborted” variety of E. abortivum that looks like a shrimp, and the mushroom variety of E. abortivum itself that looks like a typical stem and cap mushroom. If you find the aborted version, you know that the species you are looking at is E. abortivum (but which has infected a honey mushroom). If you find the stem-and-cap E. abortivum, it looks like a pretty standard entoloma mushroom, which are a genus that is notoriously difficult to identify to species. So if you attempt to eat the stem and cap version, you should know what you’re doing! I haven’t heard of issues with the aborted varieties themselves, but these things change all the time :)

I don’t eat a ton of these, but I do eat a few every year. Like any other mushroom, you get a feel for when they’re at their best stage, and these do get “styrofoamy” after a while and can get destroyed by bugs too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Do you normally find them on higher ground or lower? I don't have a whole lot of white oak in my area, mostly red and pin. There is a place with red oaks growing along a creek, and I find hen of the woods growing on them. There is an absolutely ginormous white oak, growing a little further distance from the creek. But, no moss! I always look, but I never find anything around it.
Chanterelles are a good indicator for trumpets. If you wanna find trumpets, find a spot with chanterelles, then go toward water (pond, rill, whatever) and yes look for moss, although they don't only grow in moss. They're a little easier to see when they're in moss, which is why I think it's commonly noted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Ya, they both grow so fast. I'm surprised those oysters look so aged for one night of growth. You sure they were't there the day before? Either way, if they grew in a night, they shouldn't be buggy!
Yes it was like 90 degrees that day, and they were a bit on the dry side, but almost totally bug free!! I did cut and dry a bunch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
The way I read that article, which matches with my understanding, is that you may find both the “aborted” variety of E. abortivum that looks like a shrimp, and the mushroom variety of E. abortivum itself that looks like a typical stem and cap mushroom. If you find the aborted version, you know that the species you are looking at is E. abortivum (but which has infected a honey mushroom). If you find the stem-and-cap E. abortivum, it looks like a pretty standard entoloma mushroom, which are a genus that is notoriously difficult to identify to species. So if you attempt to eat the stem and cap version, you should know what you’re doing! I haven’t heard of issues with the aborted varieties themselves, but these things change all the time :)

I don’t eat a ton of these, but I do eat a few every year. Like any other mushroom, you get a feel for when they’re at their best stage, and these do get “styrofoamy” after a while and can get destroyed by bugs too.
That matches my understanding as well, and I have found an eaten a number of the "aborted" forms. I have also found many "un-aborted" E. abortivum, and they are a very plain-looking mushroom, easy to misidentify. I'd stick to the"aborted" form, which is easy to identify, and safe to eat. As for other species involved, I have never heard or read that anywhere, and to my knowledge, this relationship is solely between E. abortivum and mushrooms from the Armillaria genus (honey mushrooms).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I got my first chants of the year on Sunday. Enough for some asparagus and chant omelets for my wife and I. We have had two really nice rains since then, so I expect things will be very good tomorrow when I go out again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Plant Plant community Deer Natural landscape Vegetation
Flower Plant Branch Botany Terrestrial plant
Leaf Mushroom Terrestrial plant Biome Natural landscape
no chantrelles yet but found a chicken some crown tips and a deer. I guess it could be worse just got over covid again and was completely worn out after my hike. Maybe go again tomorrow and see if I can find anything else. I would say the chantrelles are atleast a week or 2 out yet with this cooler weather we are having.
 
21 - 37 of 37 Posts
Top