MORELS 2020 CHIT CHAT

Discussion in 'Pennsylvania' started by trahn008, Jan 3, 2020.

  1. swpa

    swpa Morel Connoisseur

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    Beagle,
    Nice to see you again electronically as well as the usual helpful crowd. How deep are you measuring temp? I am looking at my log, and I generally find first flush at 52-55 at 6-8 inches with probe.
     
  2. beagleboy

    beagleboy Morel Connoisseur

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    I go down about 4" most of the time. Are your first ones blacks, they are supposed to be a little earlier, I have had trouble finding blacks so far. The few that I have found are just in the area that I find yellows and that hasn't been very many .
     
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  3. swpa

    swpa Morel Connoisseur

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    Yes. And my black morel trend was declining until three years ago when for some reason it began to bounce back. I do not find the early morels in the same places as the later ones but that might simply be specific to my sites. With only a few declining elm sites, everything I hunt is poplar-related.
    I expect to find the first flushes this year in the third or fourth week of March given the weather this month, but never know. In 13 or 14, I think, and I don't have the log from those years in front of me now, my earliest find was March 7, not yet worth harvesting but that's only a day or two from flush.
     
  4. shroomsearcher

    shroomsearcher Morel Connoisseur

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    Same here! I once read, I think it was on these boards, that to find blacks successfully you have to forget everything you know, or think you know, about yellows!

    A few years back I went to a morel seminar give by John Maybrier. During the seminar he sent around a baggie of dried blacks. OMG, what a smell! So spicy! I asked him what he looks for to find blacks, and he said a "popple woods". Well, we don't have a lot of those up here in NE Ohio. We have an isolated copse here and there. Maybrier lives in Michigan, and I don't doubt that he can find a popple woods up there. Once you get far enough up in there, Michigan starts looking a whole lot like Canada! No more hardwoods, it's all poplar and jack pine.

    The thing is, according to the OH Division of Forestry, there is no such thing as true poplar in this state. What many call poplar is actually Aspen. We have both Bigtooth and Dogtooth Aspen here. So, I still have no idea what to do. I just go out and wander around, earlier than I think is right for yellows, and hope that I maybe stumble into something! Hardly an organized way to go about it!
     
  5. beagleboy

    beagleboy Morel Connoisseur

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    The trees that we call tulip poplar in my area aren't true poplars either, they are in the magnolia family. A friend of mine finds his blacks at a very large black cherry tree, I look at every one I come to but all I have found around them so far has been yellows.
     
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  6. swpa

    swpa Morel Connoisseur

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    Well I think we still have tulip or yellow poplar here but, based on this discussion, I am not certain. Regardless, the older stands will be harvested soon as it seems to be a wood that is desirable now for facade work. In the past, timberers left them as they were a soft hardwood hence the large stands of mature trees around hear. Everything changes, but one thing that won't is the elusiveness of morels.
     
  7. redfred

    redfred Morel Connoisseur

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    Whats in a name????? do we know the trees we find morels under?? It's been awhile but they would use poplar in plywood also a secondary wood in furniture. I've also hear the term (poor mans walnut) for it's use. On another note..... I would personally like to apologize to Phil, Spring just may be early this year.... Good luck to all
     
  8. beagleboy

    beagleboy Morel Connoisseur

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    shroomsearcher, I should have said each area of the country has different names for the same thing. As far as popple goes I think it is what in my area is called Quaking aspen and we have another true poplar tree that is called big tooth aspen, the eastern cottonwood is also a true poplar tree. As far as I know cottonwoods do not grow in my area. I have yet to find any morels under any aspen trees. Since I saw on the New York forum that for some people the big tooth aspen is their go to tree for blacks I look under every one I come to, I have yet to find any under one. I think that trees that produce in one area of the country might not in another area. In some southern states they find a lot under hickory, yet I have a lot of hickory around here and have never found under them. Last year I even found one under a maple tree. So I guess like redfred said look for them under the trees that produce in your area and also keep looking down when walking between those trees you never know what you might find. Sorry for rambling on so much.
     
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  9. DanCB

    DanCB Morel Enthusiast

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  10. pedro

    pedro Morel Connoisseur

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    Mushroom expert.com reviews the various type of trees with photos of the tree base and leaves and national distribution
     
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  11. trahn008

    trahn008 Morel Connoisseur

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    I really noticed today on my ride home from work the grass is starting to green up. I think I'm ready, might have to pick up a new pair of sneakers for the season, but that should be it. Happy Hunting!
     
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  12. trahn008

    trahn008 Morel Connoisseur

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    BINGO!
     
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  13. trahn008

    trahn008 Morel Connoisseur

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    Hard transitions and soft transitions with yellow poplar tree's AROUND= Black Morels
     
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  14. shroomsearcher

    shroomsearcher Morel Connoisseur

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    No problem. My info comes from the Ohio Div. of Forestry, where they claim that NO true poplars grow in Ohio. There are the Quaking and Bigtooth Aspen, which resemble poplars. The Eastern Cottonwood, which has leaves that look like poplar leaves, but the tree looks nothing like one. I found an enormous specimen where I hunt. I've never seen a California Redwood or Sequoia, so this is the largest tree I have ever laid eyes on! And I have found morels near it, but not on a consistent basis.

    They claim the same status for the "tulip poplar" which they call Tulip Tree. Not a true poplar, actually a member of the Magnolia family! You know how picky taxonomic nomenclature can be. "If the stem does not enter the basal margin of the leaf at this precise angle, then it cannot be", you know what I'm saying!
     
  15. swpa

    swpa Morel Connoisseur

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    Well I look for stands of trees that are pool cue straight, grow in well drained forest, have tulip shaped seed pods that frequently catch the eye of the forager, have mixed cherry, oak, ash, and elm, often have grapevines, good leaf cover, rockiness, and limited human traffic. There might be some mayapples, spice weed, ferns, wild asparagus, false morels, old man of the woods, and an abandoned apple orchard nearby.
    But first I look for the trees evidently 'formally known as' tulip poplars here in the lower left part of pa. For those interested, that habitat had been productive for over 35 years regardless of the scientific taxonomy and nomenclature. You will have as much or as little luck picking morels with a PhD as you will with a CDL. That's my experience, and it is expressed with all due humility as along time forager who has found 6,000 in a season and 60 the next.
     
  16. beagleboy

    beagleboy Morel Connoisseur

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    Scroomsearcher , I misunderstood your question. I thought you wanted to know what type of trees they might have been finding them under. A friend of mine moved to this area from michigan and we hunted rabbits together he called quaking aspen stands popple. My mistake.
     
  17. shroomsearcher

    shroomsearcher Morel Connoisseur

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    Hey beagle, you're not wrong at all. I called them poplar for a long time until I looked at the Div. of Forestry website. Now I know better. And I also know that we don't have big Aspen woods anywhere around here! Just an isolated copse here and there. Don't know how many of them would be worth looking at.
     
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  18. redfred

    redfred Morel Connoisseur

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    I think I’m going to call everything a shade tree as long as I’m standing under it and the sun is shining.... SWPA, it sounds like we are looking for the same type of areas... I could add in those areas I may find in the lower canopy dogwood,redbud or beach.. mix in with the “formally known as tulip poplars” I would add to the list mulberry, box elder ,sassafras and maple most of these tend to be on the edges.. The only tree that seems to stop morels in the poplars for me is the oak. I’ve had good results under grapevine too.
     
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  19. beagleboy

    beagleboy Morel Connoisseur

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    I took a hike today in an area in Mifflin co. that has ramps.The first picture was taken about 100yds deep in the woods, the second picture was taken on the edge of the same woods. Both temps were about the same but there were a few ramps just starting to show on the edge, but nothing back in the woods. I think that there must have been enough sun the last few days that the more open areas ground temp was higher. IMG_4129.JPG IMG_4127.JPG
     
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  20. swpa

    swpa Morel Connoisseur

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    Thanks Fred. Right on. Stay healthy.
     
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