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Hey all I'm out in the Knoxville area and ready for some morels! I came from Ohio 10yrs ago and I always had good luck up there finding huge beautiful yellows and grays. Out of the ten years I have lived in TN ( middle and east ) I have only had luck finding smaller blacks, grays, and some smaller yellows. The only place I have found any was out in the Erwin,TN area when I lived up closer to Johnson City. I'm looking for people in the area to give me some tips for hunting here in the Knoxville area. I have 2 pieces of property I have been given permission to search that seem to have potential. I am watching the boards, checking soil temps all of that good stuff. I know the season here is a bit different than up north as well as elevation. Does the elevation seem to effect the shrooming? Do you find them up high at all? Any info on hunting the Knoxville area is appreciated.
 

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The big fat ones are out there. I live in the Chattanooga area and "sometimes" find pretty good sized morels. Six for dinner for a person of one is a full dish. Most people think you have to get into the mountains. The ones I find are at about 680 ft. elevation. I think it is the tree type. I read every book I could find about the art of Morel hunting. So now I've given up on the "abandoned apple orchards", dying Elm trees and Sycamore stands. Where I find them does not look anything like that. But I do have my eye on this 16 inch elm tree that is showing signs of distress. Go figure. Good hunting.
 

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@pomoxis64
I just retired out of the military and moved down here from southern Illinois . Been Hunting Morels my whole life . Was wanting to go hunting around the chattanooga / Harrison Bay Area . I'm used to the woods and hunting areas back home . Any tips or advice for where to look around here would be greatly appreciated !!
 

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I wonder if anyone is hunting Harrison Bay, Chester park, Booker T or any of the other state parks around the Chattanooga area. Sheese! Don't say it out loud or the rangers are going to get us. You're supposed to walk around the little path and let your dog poop on the Trillium. Semper fidelis!
 

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Oh the irony. I live near the area and want to possibly start hunting this year. It wouldn't surprise me that such public hot spots would be culled clean fairly quickly. And then there are the rules "no removal of materials". It's supposed to be protected habitat. But I guess when you're hunting you have to think outside the box a little bit. I hope to find some where I'm living, but otherwise I have friends/family in the area I may be able to ask to help keep an eye out for some spots.

Has anyone ever tried grow your own mushroom kits?
 

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The big fat ones are out there. I live in the Chattanooga area and "sometimes" find pretty good sized morels. Six for dinner for a person of one is a full dish. Most people think you have to get into the mountains. The ones I find are at about 680 ft. elevation. I think it is the tree type. I read every book I could find about the art of Morel hunting. So now I've given up on the "abandoned apple orchards", dying Elm trees and Sycamore stands. Where I find them does not look anything like that. But I do have my eye on this 16 inch elm tree that is showing signs of distress. Go figure. Good hunting.
Do y
I wonder if anyone is hunting Harrison Bay, Chester park, Booker T or any of the other state parks around the Chattanooga area. Sheese! Don't say it out loud or the rangers are going to get us. You're supposed to walk around the little path and let your dog poop on the Trillium. Semper fidelis!
was Just wondering if you ever started finding them down here I’m from Ohio and it’s hard for me to find them down here
 

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The big fat ones are out there. I live in the Chattanooga area and "sometimes" find pretty good sized morels. Six for dinner for a person of one is a full dish. Most people think you have to get into the mountains. The ones I find are at about 680 ft. elevation. I think it is the tree type. I read every book I could find about the art of Morel hunting. So now I've given up on the "abandoned apple orchards", dying Elm trees and Sycamore stands. Where I find them does not look anything like that. But I do have my eye on this 16 inch elm tree that is showing signs of distress. Go figure. Good hunting.
Morels grow where they will. I hunt mostly at my fish and game club of 2,200 acres. We have a bazillion dead elms on the property, but that thread played out a long time ago. The trees have been dead for too long a time. The only elm I've found morels around had recently died, and was still holding all it's bark. I checked it the first year I found it, and no morels. In fact, no morels that whole season, which was my very first. My second year hunting I checked that tree 5 times before I found morels. First and second time, nothing. Third time, hundreds of LBM's! fourth time, nothing, but the LBM's had all died back. My fifth time out hunting I thought about skipping that tree. But, it was only about a 10 minute hike from the road, so I decided to go. Found about 2 dozen morels where the LBM's used to be. Those are the ONLY morels I ever found under that tree. It went topot really fast! I'd keep an eye on that elm. If there's morel mycelium in that soil, associated with that tree, it should flush. But, that's the big question isn't it?

Also, we do have lots of apple trees scattered all over the property. No old orchards, and I've heard that there used to be some really nasty crap sprayed on apple orchards that could still persist in the soil. I find morels around them, and also sycamore, tulip poplar, and eastern cottonwood. I've found a local park with youngish elms near a stream and have checked it the last few years. Nothing so far, but it's close and easy to get to, so I'll keep looking. I've also found youngish living elms trees at my fish and game club but they are, at most, 6 inches in diameter. When I researched Dutch Elm Disease, I learned that elm trees become sexually mature before they become susceptible to the blight. This means there should always be young elms around, and once I started looking, I started finding! I have no idea if these tree will become old enough to flush morels before I take the big dirt nap!
 
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