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cwlake Thanks.

Oops - my bad. I meant to say I had used corn starch as my thickener, not cream of tarter. I remember thinking as I wrote it "that's not right" but didn't rethink/change it.

The Boletus bicolor cap underside does turn blue, easily.

From mushroomexpert.com
by Michael Kuo
Charles Peck named this species (1872) Boletus bicolor, the "two-colored bolete," because of its beautiful and starkly contrasting red and yellow colors. The cap and stem, when fresh, are bright red, and the young pore surface is bright yellow. The pore surface bruises blue promptly, but the mushroom's other surfaces usually do not--and the sliced flesh, most of the time, turns blue only faintly and erratically. Other crucial identification features include the proportionally shallow depth of the tube layer, and the fact that the stem is red nearly to the apex. At maturity Boletus bicolor is a medium-sized to large mushroom, which helps to distinguish it from the many similar species with much smaller stature (Boletus harrisonii, Boletus campestris, Xerocomellus rubellus, and others).

Yea!!! The fall woods are beautiful. 馃槑 馃尀
The Boletus bicolor cap underside does turn blue, easily.

That is a subject covered in one of the videos from Learn Your Land. It was titled, "If it bruises blue, it's poisonous!" Not necessarily so. Some years ago I found a whole bunch of boletes in a patch of woods off the fairway on a golf course. They were pretty big and easy to see. I went and pulled one up, and it would bruise really blue at the slightest touch! I would find tons of mushrooms there.I'd never try to eat any of them due to the pesticides, fertilizers and herbicides used on golf course, but it is one of the shroomiest places I know!
 

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Amazing what a few days, a little rain, and a drop in temp can do! Decided to check my "pinkie" spot today. They're just getting started. I have found them in this spot right up until first frost! Found on perfect specimen, no bugs, and took it. There are two maple trees growing there and I looked at the one closest to that mushroom and spotted reishi on it. There were 5 or 6 little sprouts coming out of the trunk, and one big gorgeous specimen growing at the base! I did not take it. I will go back tomorrow with my camera to get a pic to post here, and then take it. I've checked this spot for 5 or 6 years, and I've never seen reishi. I find both pinkies, Agaricus campestris, and horse mushrooms, A. arvensis, in this spot.

Then I went to check another spot where I have found chickens on an oak tree. No hens, but the ringless honeys were absolutely everywhere! And in all stages of growth. Some were shot, and decaying back into the ground. Others were in perfect condition for harvest. So, I want someone to give me the straight skinny on ringless honeys, because I've read, and heard, both sides. They are really good to eat, or just meh! I understand that you only need to bother with the caps, the stems being really tough and stringy. Also, do they dehydrate well. There is an absolute bumper crop there. No way I could use them up in a short time. I'll try to take pics of them as well.
 
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