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iwonagain, tried that tonight but with more wine. it was pretty dang good! definitely gonna do it again but if i'm being honest, fried morels are better! i'm going out to the old family farm in pawnee county to hunt tmrw. my grandma sold it after my grampa died but turns out it's a hell of a mushroom hunting spot and i can still get in. seems late in the season but conditions couldn't be better and i have high hopes.
 

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Looked for several hours today in far southern KS. It rained Friday morning there, and this morning from 3am until noon. Found shaggy manes everywhere just breaking through the surface. Zero morels.

Someone tell what this is............it was oozing our of every dead tree and from a the ground around dead trees.



 

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Morchellica: Thanks for trying out the recipe - it is important in the above to use whole whip cream and whole butter (not half half etc). If you have a handful of fresh morels left; cut them in half or quarters and try to sautee them in butter for about 10-15 min. Then add salt and pepper and serve with slightly toasted home made white/rye sourdough bread. If you don't have home made bread then white toasts will do.
 

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Found about 30-35 keepers today and about 120-150 rotten ones whilst trying out a new spot-I'll be back there next year for certain ! ;)
 

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the cedar groves i was going to hunt today no longer exist but i did hunt a lot of creek bottom that was way to grown up to tell if there were morels. i did find a few places where the weeds were still short and found lots of rotten morels and one lone keeper under a cedar tree. i've hunted quite a few cedars in the pawnee county area this last week and didn't really find any morels and i'm for certain i didn't miss them. i'm just wondering if a lot of late morel spots have yet to produce b/c of soil temps being low for such an extended amount of time?
 

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This long term cool down + moist soils is getting me wondering about the potential for a late third-fourth batch (with *very* little expectations, however): I have 2 broad theories about morel fruiting: (i) It is a combination of soil temperature and is timed with the awakening of the host tree (sap flows upward) or (ii) only the soil temperature matters. I'd opt for (i) because if (ii) would hold then I do not see any reason why we would not get a second flush in the Fall. Thou shall see !
 

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<blockquote>Someone tell what this is…………it was oozing our of every dead tree and from a the ground around dead trees.</blockquote>

Okbob, the second pic is "Wood Ear" fungus...it grows prolifically this time of year when there's a lot of rain and some hot days. It's prized by the Chinese for its texture in soups. (They typically dry it and rehydrate it, which accentuates the crunchy texture.) It doesn't have much flavor, but the texture is excellent. It's also used medicinally as an anti-inflammatory, and research shows it may have anti-cancer properties. I've never seen it growing on the ground...it fruits exclusively on wood, but it could be growing on buried wood. Whatever is in your first pic is pretty old and degraded, but definitely possible that it's Wood Ear.
 

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Benthegrate: Found these a few days ago on a rotting cottonwood log in a cedar forest - Looks like the shitake cousin you found the other day (?) - I left those behind as I only collect morels:
http://i1339.photobucket.com/albums/o712/morel101/photo_zpsex0aqbps.jpg
 

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Last 12 musketeers of the season lol - Found in the Norman area:
http://i1339.photobucket.com/albums/o712/morel101/IMG_7458_zpsm9xfx7pg.jpg
 

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<blockquote>Looks like the shitake cousin you found the other day (?)</blockquote>

Yes, those are lepidus lepideus, the "Train Wrecker." They look like giant oysters until you look under them and they have fat stems. As they get older, their gills get a little serrated, and they have a pungent odor, which is how you identify them. They are incredibly delicious! They got their name because way back before railroad ties were creosoted, these would fruit prolifically on the ties in spring and derail entire trains.
 

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Interesting historical perspective on those mushrooms - Thanks for the info and hope you had a good morel foraging season-I certainly did :) ~2400 morels (not counting naturally the 300-400 rotten/past ones I found in the last week or so).
 

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i still may pop my head in a cedar grove or two over the next week in NE OK b/c i don't think it's out of the world of possibility that i may find something. it still feels like this part of the state could have some morels hiding somewhere dark. pretty terrible year, picked shy of 15 lbs, but it was enough to give plenty away and have some good meals.
 

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Iwonagain, I think it is a combination of something. Moisture and soil temp. and the timing of the two. Plus also a little air temp\humidiy factor. I don't know about the tree sap since I hunt mostly dead elm. All I know is that when the time comes and one of those is not right your screwed. We have a saying for that up here in Mo. What's there is there.
 

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Heading through OK this morning and PM anybody have any Morels for sell between I-40 corridor or north of there? Call 309-883-3057. Thanks!
 
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