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I have a question on locating hen of the woods. Are the hens around damaged oaks or doesn't it matter. Yesterday I was in an area that had more than 100 oaks which most of them were 3' or more in diameter but as far as I could tell they were healthy and didn't find anything but some old bug infested chanterelles.
 

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In Western PA, I think I've found hen on white oak once ever. I WISH they showed up on more white oak around here, but I've seen them almost only on red.

Yes, beagle, damage to a big old tree is a decent indicator, but I still haven't found anything concrete that works even 10% of the time. WPA has areas that are loaded to the gills with red oak (and white), and I'll find a big flush on one tree in this forest, another 2 trees in another...not that people don't go out and get 100# on a few trees.

Mushrooms are a tricky bunch...
 

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Discussion Starter #384
Beagle, how I hunt hens.. Red oak family tree's prove to be the best. THE BLACK OAK which is in the red oak family are by far the number one producer for me. White oaks are good also. The KEY is hunting hens on the edge of the forest, still standing mature with some damage. The damage at times is hard to see, most times it's heart rot and sometimes it's only one branch that is dead on the tree. Light exposure is important for fruiting of hens. LOOK AROUND EVERY OAK TREE IN OPEN AREA"S (PARKS). You don't need to go on 5 mile hikes unless your edge hunting to find hens. I could pick 1000 of them and walk less than 5 miles. EDGE EDGE EDGE. I also find them on stumps but not in the numbers I find them on still standing tree's. HAPPY HUNTING! WWG1WGA!!
 

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Discussion Starter #385
Barnacle a tip for you when hunting hens. Look for black oaks (any red oak family tree) first and then white oaks. Hunt the edges of the forest first (field edge, roadside, power lines etc) zig zag 30-40 yards along that edge that's where most of the hens will be found if any are in that area. Once you get a feel for light exposure you got it nailed. Check every mature oak tree even if it's a single one in the middle of a field or a PARK (hint hint). Don't waste your time going on long hikes in the forest some could be found, but the most by far will be found on those edges!! Pick most of my hens on still standing mature stressed red oak family tree's.
From 2017!
 

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See, this is the beauty and craziness about mushrooms. All of the great hen hauls I've ever had are from trees deep in forests, nowhere near open grass or parklike settings. Not to contradict Trahn at all, as his advice here is solid. I've seen onesies-twosies in open/edge areas, but I've picked/seen 50-100# trees deep in woods with underbrush nearby. Most pickers I know find them in open areas and edges, and perhaps I just don't have the luck there.
 

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I think that is jack in the pulpit not Seng
That is NOT jack in the pulpit! Here is Jack in the Pulpit.



Beagle, how I hunt hens.. Red oak family tree's prove to be the best. THE BLACK OAK which is in the red oak family are by far the number one producer for me. White oaks are good also. The KEY is hunting hens on the edge of the forest, still standing mature with some damage. The damage at times is hard to see, most times it's heart rot and sometimes it's only one branch that is dead on the tree. Light exposure is important for fruiting of hens. LOOK AROUND EVERY OAK TREE IN OPEN AREA"S (PARKS). You don't need to go on 5 mile hikes unless your edge hunting to find hens. I could pick 1000 of them and walk less than 5 miles. EDGE EDGE EDGE. I also find them on stumps but not in the numbers I find them on still standing tree's. HAPPY HUNTING! WWG1WGA!!
True that! Last year I went on a mission to find hens. I thought back to when my old Italian Grandma would could them up for us in sauce, and serve them to us with spaghetti or some other type of pasta. I remembered where she lived, and that a guy who lived in her area would bring them to her. So, I sought to hunt in that same area.

What do you know! I found hens like crazy! They were nearly every where I looked.
 

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That is NOT jack in the pulpit! Here is Jack in the Pulpit.





True that! Last year I went on a mission to find hens. I thought back to when my old Italian Grandma would could them up for us in sauce, and serve them to us with spaghetti or some other type of pasta. I remembered where she lived, and that a guy who lived in her area would bring them to her. So, I sought to hunt in that same area.

What do you know! I found hens like crazy! They were nearly every where I looked.
Do your google search again and put in Jack in the Pulpit bearing fruit.
 

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That seeding plant WAS Jack in the Pulpit. Notice the leaves: Jacks have three leaves, like trillium or poison ivy, whereas ginseng has 3 leaves, but with 5 leaflets per leaf, looking similar to a buckeye tree leaflet.
 

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Do your google search again and put in Jack in the Pulpit bearing fruit.
Wow! Learn something every day. I've never found jack in the pulpit with the berries on it. I've only found it in it's flowering form. Saw a couple this year in one of my morel spots. They were really young. The flower and the "jack" were completely green, no color yet.

I had my doubts about the original pic being 'seng as the leaves were all wrong.
 

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Wow! Learn something every day. I've never found jack in the pulpit with the berries on it. I've only found it in it's flowering form. Saw a couple this year in one of my morel spots. They were really young. The flower and the "jack" were completely green, no color yet.

I had my doubts about the original pic being 'seng as the leaves were all wrong.
i only see the bearing fruit in the fall.
 
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