Morel Mushrooms and Mushroom Hunting banner

21 - 40 of 53 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
No, if the soil is moist enough, they can easily come out by the bulb. I don't like taking too many bulbs, and I refuse to dig them up, and at the best place I pick at I can usually count on getting 10-15% with bulbs on them. Usually the biggest ramps do that for us. Drier soils, no bulbs. It could just be your soil type.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
No, if the soil is moist enough, they can easily come out by the bulb. I don't like taking too many bulbs, and I refuse to dig them up, and at the best place I pick at I can usually count on getting 10-15% with bulbs on them. Usually the biggest ramps do that for us. Drier soils, no bulbs. It could just be your soil type.
Well, the place I find them is a creek bottom with beautiful, sandy loam soil! It would have to be soaking wet for me to pull a ramp up. And this place produces ramps with nice bulbs. Let me check here and see if I can find a pic that I know I have. Only thing is, I have so many pics saved, that I don't know if I can find it. Here goes.

DSCN0199.JPG


Found it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
I found these in Hunterdon County NJ last week. This was the first time I’ve had them or even seen them. I just started hunting morels this year and someone on a hunting forum mentioned ramps. I had no clue what they were and researched them. The next day, poof there they were. I’ve been eating them all week different ways. I chopped some up, sautéed in butter, then laid boneless seasoned trout fillets in on top of them. Wow
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I have to vent. I head out to a rather large park to maybe grab a few ramps for a meal or 2. There are quite a few patches ,some quit large, that seem to be mindfully harvested over the years. Today, there are no parking places and I see people coming out of the woods with shopping bags packed so tight that the seams were almost popping! I check a number of patches and they are trampled with so many ramps dug that it's disgusting. Certain areas may look huge but are definitely dwindling. Some people are just ignorant, greedy, irresponsible pieces of garbage! Sorry I had to get it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I have to vent. I head out to a rather large park to maybe grab a few ramps for a meal or 2. There are quite a few patches ,some quit large, that seem to be mindfully harvested over the years. Today, there are no parking places and I see people coming out of the woods with shopping bags packed so tight that the seams were almost popping! I check a number of patches and they are trampled with so many ramps dug that it's disgusting. Certain areas may look huge but are definitely dwindling. Some people are just ignorant, greedy, irresponsible pieces of garbage! Sorry I had to get it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
I hope nobody ever finds mine. I only take enough for my wife and I for a week. Maybe 2lbs? I also only take a piece from the edge of a larger patch, never from small bunches or singles. To take giant shopping bags? That’s just wrong. People get nuts because they’re free and a lot of people think no one knows what they are or where they are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
My husband makes fun of me. "Why do you always have to eat everything you find?" I reply "because it's there." If I'm hiking and I find a blueberry patch or a mullberry tree, I'll grab a handful and snack. A few elm oysters to take home, tea berries, a birch branch to chew on, a wild apple or plum. To me taking a bite of the things nature had to offer is no different than smelling and admiring a beautiful rose from your neighbors yard. I grew up foraging and my dad made sure I knew safe things to eat and things to avoid. You pay respect to what nature gives you; live off the land but never take to much.
I also get disgusted with the people who are ignorant of the fact that nature isn't the grocery store. Its not the produce department where there are cases to refill in the back. There is no one to refill it. If you trample and kill it, it's gone. Don't pick the wild orchids, they will die. Cover the chantarelle after you harvest so it doesn't dry out and die. Take only what you need or else it's going to go bad in your fridge anyway. Whoever find my morel spot ripped all the bark down off the elm tree, tore up the dead logs laying near by, and broke branches on the apple tree. It is sad. And I completely agree, @PickinFungi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
My husband makes fun of me. "Why do you always have to eat everything you find?" I reply "because it's there." If I'm hiking and I find a blueberry patch or a mullberry tree, I'll grab a handful and snack. A few elm oysters to take home, tea berries, a birch branch to chew on, a wild apple or plum. To me taking a bite of the things nature had to offer is no different than smelling and admiring a beautiful rose from your neighbors yard. I grew up foraging and my dad made sure I knew safe things to eat and things to avoid. You pay respect to what nature gives you; live off the land but never take to much.
I also get disgusted with the people who are ignorant of the fact that nature isn't the grocery store. Its not the produce department where there are cases to refill in the back. There is no one to refill it. If you trample and kill it, it's gone. Don't pick the wild orchids, they will die. Cover the chantarelle after you harvest so it doesn't dry out and die. Take only what you need or else it's going to go bad in your fridge anyway. Whoever find my morel spot ripped all the bark down off the elm tree, tore up the dead logs laying near by, and broke branches on the apple tree. It is sad. And I completely agree, @PickinFungi
It sounds like a black bear found your morel spot. They tear up dead logs for grubs, same with dead bark. And I always see wild apple trees that they rip down trying to get at the fruit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Some people found my morel spot. It's a big area and I usually never mind unless I see someone clearly over picking. Well as of late, this new person likes to leave their trash littered around. I think he is even using his empty soda cans as markers because he keeps hanging them on branches near freshly harvested stumps.. And well I keep removing the trash.

I already have to share mushrooms with the forest bugs, but I will not share with a litter bug.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
It sounds like a black bear found your morel spot. They tear up dead logs for grubs, same with dead bark. And I always see wild apple trees that they rip down trying to get at the fruit.
If it was a bear I'd be happy to share. But I've seen people with big solid plastic bags loaded with mushrooms on the same area. They didn't even have bags for the spores to spread. I haven't seen any bear tracks, but I've porcupines, possums, raccoons, and lots of deer and their tracks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
If it was a bear I'd be happy to share. But I've seen people with big solid plastic bags loaded with mushrooms on the same area. They didn't even have bags for the spores to spread. I haven't seen any bear tracks, but I've porcupines, possums, raccoons, and lots of deer and their tracks.
You must have quite a spot for mushrooms. I’d love to be able to fill a shopping bag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
509 Posts
I have to vent. I head out to a rather large park to maybe grab a few ramps for a meal or 2. There are quite a few patches ,some quit large, that seem to be mindfully harvested over the years. Today, there are no parking places and I see people coming out of the woods with shopping bags packed so tight that the seams were almost popping! I check a number of patches and they are trampled with so many ramps dug that it's disgusting. Certain areas may look huge but are definitely dwindling. Some people are just ignorant, greedy, irresponsible pieces of garbage! Sorry I had to get it out.
Disgusting! My buddy is a member of a Facebood group of ramp hunters. Some of them will NOT dig up the bulbs because it takes so long, 7 years is the number usually quoted, for a ramp seed to produce a plant. These folks just cut off the tops, and leave the bulb in the ground. I have found a huge patch that I guesstimate to be close to a mile long, which is unfortunately, located in a county metropark where no hunting or gathering is permitted.

I used to feel that this was wrong! The metroparks should offer classes on this stuff, and open up the woods for hunting! Your post makes me reconsider. I only take what I need for personal use, but it's obvious the crowd you ran into is selling! Maybe it's because so many people are laid off right now. Don't get me wrong, hunting and gathering goes on in that park all the time. We can always spot each other, and trade knowing glances when we pass by.

I've found ramps, chickens, chants, reishi and hens in there, and there's probably lots of stuff I haven't found. Mushroom are one thing. You can take them and not harm the parent organism. A ramp bulb is another story!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Went out yesterday after work and found a few interesting things.

Daldinia childiae
0422201543.jpg 0422201543a.jpg
Not edible but I've read it may be useful as a tinder. At first I thought it might be chaga, but my research said otherwise

Wild violets
0420201633.jpg 0420201601.jpg
I know the blue/purple ones are edible, but I'm not sure about the white ones. One of my books states that the yellow violets may be slightly toxic, while another says all violets are edible. Anyone have any experience?

Wild ginseng
0420201616.jpg
The unfurling arch of the stem didn't show up to well in the picture, but I'm pretty sure it's ginseng.

Fiddlehead of possible wood fern?
0422201520.jpg
I finally found ones that aren't hairy!!! They have paper like scales, a groove in the stem, and are green in color. However, the groove isn't deep and the paper seems to stay on the stem. I have read that wild ferns will hybridize and have characteristics of several types or of "no classified type" of fern. This one seems to fit mostly the characteristics of the evergreen wood fern. The papery scales wiped off easily. However, I am still not sure its identification. Does anyone have any insight or thoughts? :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Fiddlehead of possible wood fern?
View attachment 30002
I finally found ones that aren't hairy!!! They have paper like scales, a groove in the stem, and are green in color. However, the groove isn't deep and the paper seems to stay on the stem. I have read that wild ferns will hybridize and have characteristics of several types or of "no classified type" of fern. This one seems to fit mostly the characteristics of the evergreen wood fern. The papery scales wiped off easily. However, I am still not sure its identification. Does anyone have any insight or thoughts? :D[/QUOTE]
It's difficult to ID from the photo but they could be Ostrich Ferns (Fiddleheads). Do the stems have a groove like celery? If so, likely Fiddlehead. A really good way to positively ID is the presence of dried plumes from last year like these: external-content.duckduckgo.com.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
It's difficult to ID from the photo but they could be Ostrich Ferns (Fiddleheads). Do the stems have a groove like celery? If so, likely Fiddlehead. A really good way to positively ID is the presence of dried plumes from last year like these: View attachment 30006
They have a groove but it's not deep like celery. There are no old vertical fronds. But there are old, not necessarily "dead," fronts from last year's infertile fronds laying on the ground around the crown.

0423201213~2.jpg 0423201214~2.jpg
 
21 - 40 of 53 Posts
Top