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Yep, I’d wager Cantharellus cinnabarinus. (Or Cantharellus texensis, if you’re in Texas (Buyck and collaborators)). These tasty little gems grow regularly here, in North GA. Particularly forming mycorrhizal with
hardwoods — especially oaks, but also with beech trees, shagbark hickory, and aspens. Sometimes growing alone, scattered, or in loose clusters. Found from Georgia up through Michigan and Illinois. All throughout Eastern North America — really. If you do take a spore print, look for spores that are white-to-pinkish (and elongated under a microscope.) Hope this helps! Don’t let them go bad before you give them a try! These are looking plump and perfect!
 

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not C. cinnabarinus. C. cinnabarinus have thin stems. Chanterells have been broken niot quite a few species namse. Try looking on mushroomexpert.com They may or may not have a a match. Most new species haven't been put in books yet and it's hard to tell some apart unless you really know what you're doing. None have been known to have toxic effects.
 

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About taking a spore print, here's a tip I heard the other day. If you put the cap on a white piece of paper, you will have a hard time seeing a white spore print. The tip was to use a piece of tin foil! Apparently no known species of mushroom throws spore of that color, and everybody has tin foil handy. Brilliant!
 

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clear plastic also works well for spore prints. You can slide it over light or dark backgrounds for contrast.
I like waxed paper myself. Something about it makes anything from white to black stand out well and is easy to cut to size and handle.. the foil idea sounds good also.
 
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