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Thanks for some very good information, ShroomBoom. Especially the "white underwood" exposed under the peeling bark. That is exactly what I look for when trying to find the dead elms at a distance. I just have never put it into words, nor told anyone when giving them advice. I sure do wish I had included it in my YouTube video "How to Identify Dead Elms," which I posted yesterday on this Iowa board. Also your info on years 1 thru 5 of the dying elm agrees with what I have learned from experience. The link you posted also has some excellent info. Thanks again for sharing. I hope a lot of people read this.
 

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ShroomBoomblio,

You are so right about the classic Y shape 2/3rds of the way up the tree. That is something I intuitively look for also, as well as the white patches of underwood, but I guess I have never verbally expressed it. Once you learn it that pattern just leaps out at you doesn't it, but sometimes it's a LIVE elm. Oh well, I try to remember where those huge live elms are also for future prospects! There is just something about that thrill of anticipation when spotting a large dead elm top off in the distance. But, sad to say, I'm sure I've overlooked many of the smaller elms also. I would hate to know how many morels I've left standing under smaller dead elms, because I was looking up higher in the canopy for the large dead elm tops. It's hard to change that habit. I've seen a few times that there were surprisingly large patches under those little elms. I usually just stumble onto them and then spot the little dead elm.
 

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ShroomBoomblio,

I have a couple comments/questions re the excellent article by Plischke that you linked to. 1. He estimates that he finds morels under one out of every 100 - 200 dead elm trees that he checks. That figure seems very high to me, and certainly has not been the norm for me, even in a bad year. Of course, I don't count the trees, but I feel one in 20 - 40 trees would be more representative. And in a good, fertile area with the right amounts of warmth, moisture, etc., one in every 10 - 20 trees, or better. Then, again maybe I just lose track of how many. What do you think of the one in 100 - 200 estimate? 2. He mentioned a dead elm tree that he collected 200 morels under every year for 5 or 6 years. What a tree! He even told the location! I've never seen anything close to that. I'm a little skeptical. He also recommended driving back roads, and getting out of the car for further inspection of good looking areas. He offered many good tips, but that one was questionable. Most landowners would not appreciate that at all. Survivors would be prosecuted.
 

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ShroomBoomblio,

Thanks for replying to my comments and questions. Yeah, Plischke (and I) used the term "100 - 200 dead elms" like it was nothing, but you're right, that is a LOT of elms. I'm blessed to hunt where there are a lot of elms, but I have no idea how many I look under. I do know I walk all day in rough terrain and the undergrowth and foliage gets thicker every year. The 22 lb. tree terrain was not the norm. You could tell how weary I sounded at the end of "Confessions of a Tree Hunter - Part One and Part Two," if you watched them. Age (71) has a lot to do with it. Lol.

No, I'm not in Iowa, but close by - all five of my morel videos were filmed in Southwest Wisconsin. I've been blessed with some good mushroom habitat. Good luck this next two weeks. Hopefully it will be better than the last three years. I hope you find another motherlode!
 
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