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I'm looking forward to chants, too. I'm new to the area and only been hunting for edibles the past few years (spent a lot of time with books and internet sources--spent, er... invested, lots of money on the former as well). So far, my comfort zone for identifying and consuming are morels, half free morels, chicken of the woods, hen of the woods, oysters, honeys, lions mane, hedge hogs, giant puff balls, a couple of easy boletes like old man of the woods, pheasant backs, aborted entelomas, and golden chanterelles. Some, like pheasant backs, are only appealing to me if I can't find what I consider the good stuff. On my almost comfortable with eating list are blewits and meadow mushrooms/pink bottoms. Outside of oysters, I tend to be really careful on the gilled mushrooms. So far, my collections have been in northern Illinois, northern Indiana, southern Wisconsin and northern Arkansas. The different areas seem to present very different opportunities. I'm eager to see what the southern Ohio area has to offer. I hope other folks will post their non-morel finds on here. A heads-up on fruiting events is a good thing if you've been caught dozing or working too much!
 

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Hmmm...

I'm coming in here as a native of the mycophobic South (British Isles heritage carry over). I am not really in the habit of thinking about guarding my mushroom spots I've never felt that there were going to be people out there to be as crazy as me in looking for the things. (Except maybe morels, since even when I had permission to hunt on private land in the upper Midwest, I could see evidence of poaching going on.) Where I grew up, the biggest risk in telling people what you were dong or finding is that they might think you are some kind of hippie or dopehead. On the other hand, you didn't dare disclose when, where or how you came by that wonderful mess of frog legs.... That was triple topsecret information!

Morelseeker--I agree that hens can be great when they are young. I've found them to be an excellent mushroom for storage by drying.

I just hope that we get a reasonable amount of rain this year. I had a wonderful spot in southern Wisconsin to hunt golden chanterelles, but last year, I think that I found one or two pitiful specimens the whole season. I love the golden chanterelles. Relatively easy to identify, easy to spot, great taste, a smell that just makes you hungry and not much competition in looking for them. Everything else was pretty much a bust except for a few things like chickens and lion's manes which were drawing water from trees or snags which still had some wood in the ground to draw in some water.
 
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