Morel Mushrooms and Mushroom Hunting banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For the last several years, I have been getting this yellow mushrooms in my backyard. They turn brown as they get older. They grow in large clumps. Are they edible or dangerous? I was thinking about getting my golf clubs out and teeing off on them, or would that spread them more every year? Should I use my driver or 9 iron?
36611
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
I have been doing some investigating, my guess is ringless honey mushrooms. I have some pics of a spore print on the Indiana page and Minn page.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
They certainly appear to be Honey mushrooms. Some eat them but they take a LOT of pre-preparation to get rid of the toxins they contain. We have feinds who took over 2 hours to pre-prepare them prior to taking them home to cook. It involves par boiling more than once. I personjally can't eat them at all since the pre- cooking does not remove every bit of the toxin. They would have to be growing from an underground source of wood. Did you have a tree removed or one nearby where the mushrroms could be growing from the roots, especially if a tree is diseased? They are not considered deadly but cause bad gastrointestinal issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I decide not to eat them. I was getting these mushrooms around a maple tree for the past several years. Last year, I cut the tree down to get more light on my vegetable garden. This year it was very dry. I had a little rain and these mushrooms shot up around the ground stump of the tree. With all the mushrooms growing on it’s roots, this tree must have been in trouble with before I cut it down. They do seem to be Ringless honey mushrooms. Some say they are not edible and some say they are delicious? I don’t like the sound of toxins in these mushrooms. Many people can’t eat them. I’m getting so much vegetables from my garden, I don’t need to eat them. The only wild mushroom that I have eaten are morels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
582 Posts
TimG, where'd you get that information from. Sounds like it could have been from a European Mushroom Guide. The only special preparations I know of is just make sure they are cooked well. If only partially cooked they can cause gastric upsets. I dried 2 gallons of Armillaria this Fall so far. I use them in Asian dishes like Chop Suey or Fried Rice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the reply. In August, the mushrooms turned brown and disappeared very quickly. They had a lot of insects in them anyway. Next year, if they come up full force again, I might try to “small“ sample early to see if I can eat them without gastric problems. Do you dry them in a dehydrator? I getting so much from my little garden in August to eat, can & freeze, I might can or dry them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
266 Posts
I just had to put my 2 cents in for what it's worth. I've been collecting and eating Honey Mushrooms for 20 years. The only prep is to dry them on window screens next to the wood stove and then put 'em in a mason jar or vacuum pack them for future use. Then just rehydrate like any other mushroom when your ready to eat them. Jack is right, just make sure and cook them well! In fact Jack, I think Asian cuisine suits them real well! I myself have a gallon or so dried from last year! Anyway, just an FYI from experience...Happy 'Shroomin'....

PS....the stems can be kinda tough; I usually cut the caps off with just an inch or less of stem.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top