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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
I’m curious to know if any of you out there have drawn any correlations between the snowfall in the Winter and the quality of the morel season in the Spring.

My thoughts are that more snow would mean more moisture that will saturate the earth more and for a longer period of time than the equivalent moisture in rainfall would, making for a better morel season, and the packing of leaf litter by the snow may also be advantageous to spotting the elusive delicacies.

Does anyone have any thoughts or experience to draw from to make any sort of correlation here?
 

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I don't think it has too much to do with how good the season will be. Last year in my area we had very little snow and I had an above average season. I think it depends on the moisture we receive right before and during the season with the right temperatures. If the temperatures stay below 70 for highs and don't go below 40 after they appear and we continue to get enough moisture that could prolong the season. Which gives more time to pick, which should translate into a good season. Some feel cold weather sets the morels on the mycelium, but I think soil, trees, temperature, and moisture are key. Just my opinion.
 

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Thanks for your thoughts! I definitely agree that the moisture and temperature more proximal to and during the season would seem to be more important to a good season versus the characteristics of the preceding winter conditions, and of course beyond the necessary soil factors and mycorhizzal associations for the fungus to be present.

I had a pretty epic season last year and we barely had any snow in my area at all, but Spring time was very wet. Unfortunately the season seemed to have been cut short by a rapid climb to higher temperatures later in the season.

Hoping for a bountiful season to come for all in 2021!
 

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I agree with beagleboy. It's the soil moisture just before and during the time of spring that temperateness are just right. This is when the trees begin to leaf out. This is just or the eastern mountainous areas. The soil in ther mtns dries out very quickly for the most part so any snow over the winter has long since gone away. I've kept reocrds of winter snows and prior years rainfall for over 30 years in the Luray/Front Royal area of VA. Nothing seems to indicate how well morels will fruit excpet for the last few weeks prior to and during the normal morel season.
 
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